Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘The Goonies’

“Just because you’ve made a movie doesn’t mean anyone’s going to see it.”
Kent Stock

It’s hard to believe that last night ended the final season of the San Francisco Giants’ 52 year drought without winning a World Series. They’ve had some great players over the years. Looking back it’s hard to believe that MLB Hall of Fame greats Willie Mays,Willie McCovey and Juan Marichal played on the same team but somehow never won a World Series.  Congrats San Francisco, home of the 2010 World Series champions.

But for the next few days I want to talk about the baseball movie The Final Season. Even if you’re not a baseball fan, I think you’ll find the story of its sixteen year journey to get made an interesting one. Though it’s taken me a few years, the timing just seems to be fitting to write about this 2007 independent film that was set and filmed in Iowa.

Yesterday I went to hear Kent Stock speak about how his simple failed journey to become a professional baseball player ended up being the central character in a movie where actor Sean Astin (The Goonies, Lord of the Rings) played him.  After modest success as a high school player he received only one scholarship to play baseball in college, but that was enough to kept his long time dream of playing professional ball alive—at least for two more years.

After his sophomore season it became apparent that he not only didn’t have what it took to play pro baseball, but that it would be better for him to focus on his education and his ball playing days were over. His new dream was to become a teacher and coach high school baseball. After graduating from college he got one job offer to coach, but it was girls JV volleyball. He took the job and made the most of it and got promoted to the variety girls volleyball coach. He made the most of that as well.

While scouting a team his team would be playing in the playoffs he met an Iowa high school baseball coach legend, Jim Van Scoyoc (played by Powers Boothe in the movie). That providential meeting with Van Scoyoc would lead Stock to his first baseball coaching opportunity that would eventually lead to a feature film based on the team he coached.

Keep in mind that the places I’m talking about are small towns in Iowa that unless you are familiar with the area are unknown to most people; Ankeny, Forest City, Decorah, Belle Plaine and Norway. Not exactly places one would expect would lead to Hollywood.

Kent Stock’s story is one of being faithful in the little things.

It’s also a story of a video producer in Des Moines, Iowa named Tony Wilson who believed enough in Stock’s story and the team he coached to pursue turning it into a movie. It was a journey that would take 16 years to see fully realized, and one that almost cost Wilson his life. I met Wilson a couple years ago at a film festival and for the next few days I will share some insights from him as he recounts his passion for seeing this story be told and the ups and downs it took to bring it to the big screen.

In Stock’s talk yesterday he spoke of his appreciation for Wilson persevering though many hard times  to see The Final Season get produced. Stock spoke about how much he learned about the film business during the making of the film and recounted several lessons learned including, “Hollywood producers have egos bigger than this auditorium,” and “Hollywood is a different monster. I hope my daughter’s never go to Hollywood.”

He said they went through eight script revisions before they filmed the one directed by David Mickey Evans (Sandlot). Art D’Alessandro and James Grayford were the screenwriters.  In Stock’s talk yesterday he ended his talk with a question that is asked in a key scene in the film, “How do you want to be remembered?”

Who would have ever guessed that becoming a JV high school girls volleyball coach in a small town in Iowa could lead to a feature film being done on part your life?

The Final Season (Part 2)

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

Since I agree that creativity is simply connecting influences (not my phrase) today’s post is a good example of that. A few days ago I wrote about writer/director John Hughes and yesterday I wrote about Youngstown, Ohio. In doing that research I stumbled upon a connection between the two—Home Alone.

That little $15 million film that went on to make over $500 million world wide was written by John Hughes and directed by Christopher Columbus. Youngstown? That’s where Columbus spent much of his childhood and graduated from high school. (Technically, the northern suburb of Champion, Ohio where he attended John F. Kennedy High School.) His father was a coal miner.

Columbus headed to NYU to attend film school. (If you look at  a map you see if you head due east on Interstate 80 from Northeast Ohio and drive for 6 hours it will take you right into Manhattan.) While still a student at NYU Columbus sold his first script, which filmbug.com says was called Jocks, and was “a semi-autobiographical comedy about a Catholic schoolboy who struggles with his religion and his inability to succeed on the high school football team.”  After graduating from NYU he sold the script Reckless, “based on his experiences as a factory worker in Ohio. The film was directed by James Foley and starred Aidan Quinn and Daryl Hannah.”

But what really put Columbus on the map was working with Spielberg directly for three years as he developed his writing style and that resulted in his writing Gremlins (1984) and The Goonies (1985). Columbus directed Home Alone in ’90 and two more John Hughes films before directing the first two Harry Potter films.

In a 2003 DGA article it was pointed out about Columbus:

“If there is a common theme to his films, it would be variations on familial relationships. Home Alone is about a boy who loses his family and must find the inner strength to survive alone. Mrs. Doubtfire is about a man who loses his family through divorce and the only way he can reenter their world is by doing the outrageous, dressing up as the family housekeeper. Only the Lonely, which Columbus also wrote, is about a man who needs to extricate himself from his mother’s domineering presence in order to marry the woman he loves. And, of course, there’s Harry Potter, the tale of a boy living a miserable existence with his aunt and uncle who finds refuge with an extended loving ‘family’ at Hogwarts, a school for wizards.”

Columbus clarified the common theme in most of his films:

“It’s always about the search for a family or the redefining of who your family is. I guess it’s the fact that sometimes you play on your biggest fear. My biggest fear in my life would be to lose my family. So I’ve always been drawn to that theme. I mean, it’s odd. I never really talked or thought about it much, but if you look at the films I’ve done, particularly the films I’m really most happy with, and even the films that weren’t that successful, I think there is a thematic link. Most of them are about someone potentially losing their family.”
Christopher Columbus
DGA Magazine January 2003

Columbus is part of a small tribe of filmmakers whose films have made more than $1 billion at the box office. Not bad for a guy from Youngstown who used to work in a factory.

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: