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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Jobs’

“I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.”
Steve Jobs

Enough about all these Indiana Jones posts I’ve been writing lately, today I’m pulling a quote from Iowa’s Ashton Kutcher.  The one that when I last checked was the highest paid TV star. Forbes estimated his May 2011 to May 2012 earnings were $24 million dollars. The actor who not only stars in Two and A Half Men, but plays Steve Jobs in the just released feature Jobs (2013). And another of his side jobs (no pun intended) is as a spokesman for Nikon cameras.

Busy guy. Successful guy. Here’s what the Iowa born and raised Kutcher had to say the other night at the Teen Choice Awards:

“In Hollywood and in the industry and the stuff we do there are a lot of insider secrets to keeping your career going. And a lot of insider secrets to making things tick…I believe that opportunity looks a lot like hard work. When I was 13 I had my first job with my dad carrying shingles up to the roof. And then I got a job washing dishes at a restaurant. And then I got a job in a grocery store deli. And then I got a job in a factory sweeping Cheerios dust off the ground. And I’ve never had a job in my life that I was better than. I was always just lucky to have a job. And every job I had was a stepping stone to my next job. And  I never quit my job until I had my next job. And so opportunities look a lot like work.”
Ashton Kutcher

A few years ago I did a video shoot for Ogilvy Public Relations at the PEPSICO/Quaker Oats factory in Cedar Rapids where Kutcher swept the floors. One worker there told me, “All I do at my job is watch Life go by.” (As in Life cereal.) Great line.

P.S. Opportunity looked a lot like work to Steve Jobs as well. Here’s the trailer for Jobs (where Ashton Kutcher looks a lot like Steve Jobs) :

Related Quotes:
Steve Jobs (1955-2011)
Making A Name For Yourself 101
Screenwriter’s Work Ethic (Tip #2)
Sneaky Long Screenwriting “I’m Zack Johnson and I’m from Cedar Rapids, Iowa. That’s about it, I’m a normal guy.”
Kurt Warner…What a Story (Super Bowl MVP from Cedar Rapids.)
Beatles, Cody, King & 10,000 Hours
The Juno-Iowa Connection (Kutcher attended the same college as Diablo Cody—The University of Iowa)

Scott W. Smith

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If you’ve read Malcolm Gladwell’s bestselling books The Tipping Point and Blink then you are familiar with his interesting way of looking at the world. You may not always agree with his conclusions, but his observations are always thought provoking. His recent book Outilers is no different. In fact, it is the perfect book for this blog and I will write about it more in the coming days.

But if you are not familiar with Outliers, or even Galdwell, I wanted to make sure they both got on your radar. The subtitle to Outliers is The Story of Success. Galdwell looks at why an usually high number of the top hockey players are born in January, February, and March. Why Hamberg, Germany played a key role in developing the talent of the Beatles. And why being born on or around 1955 was important to be a computer wiz like Bill Gates, Paul Allen, and Steve Jobs. 

“People don’t rise from nothing. We do owe something to parentage and patronage. The people who stand before kings may look like they did it themselves. But the fact they are invariably the beneficiaries of hidden advantages and extraordinary opportunities and cultural legacies that allow them to learn and work hard and make sense of the world in ways others cannot. It makes a difference where and when we grew up. The culture we belong to and the legacies passed down by our forebears shape the patterns of our achievment in ways we cannot begin to imagine. It’s not enough to ask what successful people are like, in other words. It is only by asking where they are from that we can unravel the logic behind who succeeds and who doesn’t.”

We’ll look more into this beginning tomorrow with a special Q&A with Colin Covert, the film critic for the Star Tribune in Minneapolis. One cannot ignore the fact that two films in the that two years that  have made over $100 million at the box office (Juno & Gran Torino) were written by writers in the Minneapolis area.

Related post: Screenwriting Jamaican-Olympic Style

Update: I just decided at random  to see when three of the top all-time pro hockey players (off the time of my head) were born and Gladwell’s research was on the money;  Wayne Gretzky (January), Bobby Orr (March), Gordie Howe (March).  I think Gladwell, and those whose he reports on who have done research in this area, are on to something. 

 

Scott W. Smith

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