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Posts Tagged ‘Red Notice’

I have a feeling this is going to be Chris Moore week. The producer is known for his work on Good Will Hunting, American Pie, and Manchester by the Sea.

But if you can, track down the DVDs of the first two seasons of Project Greenlight which featured Moore along with Matt Damon and Ben Affleck. There are serious filmmaking lessons taught there as two films go through pre-production, production, and post-production. Just two examples that come to mind from memory:

1) Moore takes to task the location scout of Stolen Summer for picking a location to shoot two kid actors where the train goes by every five minutes making it difficult to get a full take of the scene in before they are interrupted again.

2) Elsewhere he criticizes the director for wasting a whole day building a platform in a lake for an eye of God POV shot looking down on a young boy in the water. It could be a brief drone shot today, but back in 2001 it was team of people building a platform. All for a shot that was too over-the-top to be used. Thankfully, just before they wrapped production for the day, Moore recommended to the cameraman that he get a shot of the young boy at dusk just on the edge of the lake just looking out at the water. That shot that probably took a minute to shoot and is what made the film.

Fast forward to the end of last year when he reflected on how the film business had changed since he first began working in it back in the 1990s. Certainly, the COVID pandemic beginning in 2020 affected the whole theatrical experience, marketing, and the changing nature of being a movie star. As streaming companies are having their finest moment as viewers embrace options at home or on their phone, Moore sees a disturbing trend emerging where streamers are just pushing out movie after movie to keep subscribers.

Red Notice [2021] is still going to be bigger for Netflix than a movie that doesn’t have The Rock, Gal Godot, and Ryan Reynolds. But when I use that example when I’m speaking in colleges, what I say is think about It for a second. That should be seen as the example as the end, right? To some extent, that movie should be recognized in our business as the jumping of the shark. . . .They had to have three of the biggest movie stars to get attention. I think those are three of the most charismatic performers we have out there. I did a movie years ago with Ryan Reynolds called Waiting, and he is super entertaining. I think The Rock is so charismatic. And Gal Godot has proved to be charismatic. She can be fun. I go, I’m definitely watching that movie. But when I watched it, I’m like it’s sort of like that phrase ‘It’s all sizzle and no steak.’ It’s fine, it has all the stuff there. But if you’re going to sit down and bring The Rock, Ryan Reynolds, and Gal Godot together, you should f—ing blow me out of the water…But the point is that we might be at the moment of volume right now, where all these streamers and everybody want so much product that everyone is jumping the shark. Like the whole business is jumping the shark right now.”
—Oscar-nominated producer Chris Moore
Indie Film Hustle 542, interview with Alex Ferrari

Once upon a time, people used to go to a movie just because Paul Newman, or Robert Redford, or Julia Roberts, or George Clooney, or Sandra Bullock, or Denzel Washington was in it. Today, because of the zillions of movie options (on top of video games, YouTube, TikTok, etc.) there’s a good chance viewers won’t even watch a streaming movie featuring the biggest name actors. And Moore’s point is even if they do, the movie’s themselves tend not to be the prestige movies of the past. The much anticipated Top Gun 2 comes out in May, and it will be interesting to see the response. The deck is stacked in its favor. But if people don’t show up in theaters to see “a Tom Cruise movie”( if there ever was one) look for fewer $150 million budget movies that are star centered.

P.S. And to show that Alex Ferrari was hustling back in 2003, here’s his audition tape for Project Greenlight, Season 2 where he made it into the top 25 of director’s chosen. That video reminds me of a Judd Apatow quote, “If you’re not obsessed, you don’t stand a chance.”

Scott W. Smith is the author of Screenwriting with Brass Knuckles

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