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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Bay’

It looks like 2011 is going to be the year of the clones. Not in terms of movies in the theaters (because that’s always the case), but in terms of my exploring the topic from a screenwriting perspective.

“You don’t get to be a Hollywood hitmeister like (Michael) Bay — 200 Zillion Tickets Sold! — without indulging in formulas, and the characters Star Warshero Ewan McGregor and Scarlett Johansson (Lost in Translation) play in The Island bear a striking resemblance to the hyperactive narcs of Bad Boys, the tireless Earth-savers of Armageddon, and the dashing flyboys and selfless nurse of Pearl Harbor. Bay watchers know the king of the big-budget directors has been in the cloning game for a decade now, and that he knows a good thing when he repeats it.”
Bill Gallo
Send in the Clones
SF Weekly July, 20, 2005

And though Gallo’s quote from a critic’s perspective is meant in the pejorative sense, for the screenwriter inside you it is should make you sit up and take notice. Time and time again it’s been said that getting a feature produced and released into theaters takes a minor miracle. (Getting people to see the film and then to win awards takes a major miracle.) So it’s worth it to at least take a look at what kind of films are being made because most screenwriters would rather be writing movies rather than just scripts that are left unproduced.

Again don’t be turned off by the word clone. Don’t think of it as a mere copy, but as containing similar DNA. If it’s good enough for Spielberg, Lucas, Coppola, Scorsese, etc.—maybe there’s something to it. Yes, of course, there are bad clones (Pasadise two years after Blue Lagoon*) but keep in mind that Castway was a modern retelling of Robinson Crusoe and (as Lee A. Matthias points out) Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet was updated into West Side Story.

In fact, there were 13 Oscar nominations between Castaway and West Side Story. Take what you want and make it your own. And just for the record Robinson Crusoe was first published in 1719 and Romeo and Juliet circa 1560. With reports of similar stories of both being told even before those authors were born. The quest for love and survival are as primal and universal as you can get.

*Of course, I haven’t seen it since in came out in 1980, but Blue Lagoon starring Brooke Shields was probably just a retelling from a youth perspective of Robinson Crusoe. Toss in the TV shows LOST and Gilligan’s Island and you can see the stranded on an island concept is never going away. Here’s a trailer you may have never seen from a movie called Horrors of Spider Island about “eight beautiful girls” and one man stranded on an island (Hmmmmm):

Scott W. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

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“Mark’s script was the best page-turner I’ve ever read,  I flew through it.”
Director Tony Scott (Unstoppable) 

(Sorry for the strange format WordPress is acting funny today.)
After several days of talking about lower budget Indie films I thought I’d jump tracks and look at the other end of the spectrum. Unstoppable, which came with a budget of 100 million dollars, is a full-bore Hollywood film. I saw it last night and enjoyed the ride with the rest of the audience in the theater. In its simplicity it’s reminiscent to many films including Speed. 

 

In this case you missed the movie’s advertising, the story revolves around a runaway train. Simple, right?
The film was shot in Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. Since I’m a big fan of seeing parts of the country that don’t get much screen time, it was a fresh way to give a time-tested genre a new twist. The film was inspired by true life events regarding an unmamanned train incident known as the Crazy Eights incident in Ohio back in 2001.
The script was written by Mark Bomback, who also wrote Live Free or Die Hard starring Bruce Willis. Bomback is a graduate of Wesleyan University where he was an English major. A couple of years ago Vanity Fair mentioned Wesleyan’s Entertaining Class and how the small Connecticut school “has turned out a shockingly disproportionate number of Hollywood movies and shakers” listing among its graduates, Akiva Goldsman (A Beautiful Mind), Michael Bay (Transformers),  Matthew Weiner (Mad Men), and Sebastian Junger (The Perfect Storm).
That’s just a partial list that most films schools couldn’t match. (Anybody know why? Secret handshake?)
But back to Unstoppable, the movie.
“Like a lot of children, I liked trains as a kid, but I certainly wasn’t a fan. I started researching the film (Unstoppable) from a place of complete ignorance. Trains are ubiquitous, but you never think about how the entire country depends on them so it seemed like an interesting setting for a film. Trains haven’t been done in a while so I thought this might be a new way to introduce them; they’re so old school, they’re new school. We wanted audiences to think that Frank or Will could die at any moment and the movie would still continue because audiences would understand the train can’t derail until, at best, the end of the film. So the question is, how do you maintain that sense of tension? I did my best to stay within the bounds of realism and not go too far.”
Mark Bomback
Emanuellevy.com

Unstoppable
in its opening week has made back about  a third of its production budget and is on track to break even in the states. But because it’s a universal action picture it will do well overseas it will probably cover it’s advertising budget and then some.

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