Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Marceline’

Screen Shot 2020-02-03 at 5.51.46 PM

2013 Post by Patrick Mahomes

“As a 17-year-old, Patrick Mahomes dreamed one day that he would be able to say those words [‘I’m going to Disney World’] if he won a Super Bowl. Fast-forward seven years and Mahomes’ dream certainly came true.”
Eduardo Gonzalez
Los Angeles Times
Feb. 3. 2020

Last night, Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes led his team to a 31-20 victory over the San Francisco 49ers. And he picked up  Super Bowl LVI MVP honors along the way. Here’s what he’s been up to the last 17 hours or so.

Disney World in greater the Orlando, Florida area just is 12 miles away from where I’m typing this post. It’s sunny and 73 at 5:00. It’s like Disney and Mahomes wrote the perfect script.

On Wednesday, the Chiefs will be honored back in Missouri with a parade. Having won their first Super Bowl in 50 years, I think it’s going to be quite a celebration.

About a decade ago I spent some time on a various productions in Missouri and took a little time visiting some of Walt Disney’s old stomping grounds. In a 2009 post I talked about visiting the town of Marceline, MO where Walt Disney spent time as a child. That Main Street that Mahomes is visiting today at Walt Disney World was inspired by the Main St. in Marceline.

In the 2011 post Walt & Walter in KC, I touched on driving by the building where Walt Disney “built his own studio that created Laugh-O-Grams that became popular enough for Disney to have a building and several animators.” Though he eventually filed for bankruptcy and had a nervous breakdown.

But every story needs a reversal—a comeback. It took Disney few years, but he found wild success in California. It only took Mahomes a few months to find his wild success, coming back from a knee injury earlier in the year that he thought was going to sideline him for the season.

P.S. Watching the NFL honor the top 100 players of all time before the Super Bowl, it was fun to see three players that I’ve had the opportunity to directly work with in my career as a cameraman and video producer—Eric Dickerson, Reggie White, and Deion Sanders.

Scott W. Smith 

Read Full Post »

photo-39

At the beginning of 2012 I decided for various reasons that after blogging everyday for three years that I would take the weekends off from blogging. But that all changes today, in that I will use Saturday’s to do a repost of pervious posts. The idea came to me Thursday after I had a meeting at Disney in Celebration, Florida. In that meeting the town of Marceline, Missouri came up and it brought back a trip I took there a few years ago. Back on March 6, 2009 I wrote the post below. So with no real fanfare I bring a new wrinkle to this blog—after 1538 posts— by doing my first repost:

disneydsc_6324

Walt Disney was a little like Moses. He never made it to the promised land. Disney died a few years before his dream project, Walt Disney World, opened in Florida in 1971.

I remember going to Disney World that opening year and it was magical. Central Florida was not the sprawling place that it is today. No, for better or worse, that sprawl is the after effects of Walt Disney World. Before Disney took a rural area and transformed it into one of the top destinations in the world, Central Florida was lucky to have air conditioning and indoor plumbing.

And in those pre-Disney days in the Orlando area, other than putt-putt golf courses, go-kart rides, and Gatorland there wasn’t a whole lot of competition for a place like Disney World.

Now Orlando has plenty of theme parks, as well as places with indoor plumbing, air-conditioning, and more than its share of strip malls. Ah, the power of imagination.

There is no question that Walt Disney is a product of the Midwest, having been born in Chicago and raised in Missouri. But few realize the huge impact little  Marceline, MO had on Walt’s imagination and in effect on the world. For Marceline’s Main Street is the inspiration for Main Street USA.

signdsc_6326

When you drive down Marceline’s Main St. today it doesn’t really seem magical. There’s no indication that there is anything special about this place. It’s not one of those quaint main streets you stumble upon while traveling that makes you say, “I’d like to live here.”

But that’s the place where young Walt Disney watched the parades go by on his way to becoming the filmmaker who has won more Oscars than any one else (32).

The farm Disney lived on (and worked on at a young age) in Marceline was also no doubt  fertile ground for young Walt as observing animals played such a large part of his enduring success.

Wade Sampson at mouseplanet.com  unearthed an interview Disney did back in 1933 following the success of his newest film The Three Little Pigs:

“All this talk about my making a lot of money is bunk.  After 10 years of pretty tough sledding, I am now making a moderate profit on my products, but every dime I take in is immediately put back into the business. I’m building for the future. And my goal isn’t millions; it’s better pictures. I’m not interested in money, except for what I can do with it to advance my work. The idea of piling up a fortune for the sake of wealth seems silly to me. Work is the real adventure in life. Money is merely a means to make more work possible….The secret of success if there is any, is liking what you do. I like my work better than my play. I play polo, when I have time, and I enjoy it, but it can’t equal work!”
Walt Disney

And work in 1933, during the Great Depression, was not always easy to come by. Disney provided not only entertainment in a difficult time but also a lot of jobs.  Today Walt Disney Studios still entertains and The Walt Disney Company has annual revenues around $35 Billion.

Side note: I think it’s worth mentioning that Mark Twain’s hometown of Hannibal, Missouri (and his inspiration for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer) is only about an hour and a half away from Marceline, MO. As well as Twian’s birth place of Florida, MO.

Related Post: Walt & Walter in KC –In 2011 I did a video shoot in Kansas City that turned out to be just down the street where Disney built his first studio. I took a photo of that building which, though not in use, is still standing.

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

disneydsc_6324

Walt Disney was a little like Moses. He never made it to the promised land. Disney died a few years before his dream project, Walt Disney World, opened in Florida in 1971.

I remember going to Disney World that opening year and it was magical. Central Florida was not the sprawling Central Florida that it is today. No, for better or worse, that sprawl is the after effects of Walt Disney World. Before Disney took a rural area and transformed it into one of the top destinations in the world, Central Florida was lucky to have air conditioning and indoor plumbing.

And in those pre-Disney days in the Orlando area, other than putt-putt golf courses, go-kart rides, and Gatorland there wasn’t a whole lot of competition for a place like Disney World.

Now Orlando has plenty of theme parks, as well as places with indoor plumbing, air-conditioning, and more than its share of strip malls. Ah, the power of imagination.

There is no question that Walt Disney is a product of the Midwest, having been born in Chicago and raised in Missouri. But few realize the huge impact little  Marceline, MO had on Walt’s imagination and in effect on the world. For Marceline’s Main Street is the inspiration for Main Street USA.

signdsc_6326

When you drive down Marceline’s Main St. today it doesn’t really seem magical. There’s no indication that there is anything special about this place. It’s not one of those quaint main streets you stumble upon while traveling that makes you say, “I’d like to live here.”

But that’s the place where young Walt Disney watched the parades go by on his way to becoming the filmmaker who has won more Oscars than any one else (32).

The farm Disney lived on (and worked on at a young age) in Marceline was also no doubt  fertile ground for young Walt as observing animals played such a large part of his enduring success.

Wade Sampson at mouseplanet.com  unearthed an interview Disney did back in 1933 following the success of his newest film The Three Little Pigs:

“All this talk about my making a lot of money is bunk.  After 10 years of pretty tough sledding, I am now making a moderate profit on my products, but every dime I take in is immediately put back into the business. I’m building for the future. And my goal isn’t millions; it’s better pictures. I’m not interested in money, except for what I can do with it to advance my work. The idea of piling up a fortune for the sake of wealth seems silly to me. Work is the real adventure in life. Money is merely a means to make more work possible….The secret of success if there is any, is liking what you do. I like my work better than my play. I play polo, when I have time, and I enjoy it, but it can’t equal work!”
                                                                                              Walt Disney 

And work in 1933, during the Great Depression, was not always easy to come by. Disney provided not only entertainment in a difficult time but also a lot of jobs.  Today Walt Disney Studios still entertains and The Walt Disney Company has annual revenues around $35 Billion.

Side note: I think it’s worth mentioning that Mark Twain’s hometown of Hannibal, Missouri (and his inspiration for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer) is only about an hour and a half away from Marceline, MO. As well as Twian’s birth place of Florida, MO.

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: