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Posts Tagged ‘Harvard Law School’

“The ‘if-I-had-time’ lie is a convenient way to ignore the fact that novels require being written and that writing happens a sentence at a time. Sentences can happen in a moment. Enough stolen moments, enough stolen sentences, and a novel is born—without the luxury of time. Lawyer Scott Turow wrote his riveting novel Presumed Innocent* on his daily commuter train.”
Julia Cameron
The Right to Write
page 14

*The 1990 movie Presumed Innocent starring Harrison Ford was based on Turow’s international best-selling book with the screenplay being written by Frank Pierson and Alan J. Pakula. According to Box Office Mojo it made $221,303,188. worldwide. It’s probably worth mentioning that before Turow got on that commuter train he had graduated from not only Harvard Law School but had a Master’s in Creative Writing from Stanford University. He has written a total of eight books, has a website,  and is currently a partner at Sonnernschein Nath & Rosenthal in Chicago.

Update: Just read where Turow studied with Pulitzer-Prize winning author Wallace Stegner, the founder of the writing program at Stanford. Because I can’t seem to escape this theme, Stegner was born in Lake Mills, Iowa and educated (master’s degree, doctorate) at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa. More on Turow & Stegner in coming days.

Related posts: The Breakfast Club for Writers
Filmmaking Quote of the Day #4 (Will Smith)
Beatles, Cody, King & 10,000 Hours
Screenwriter’s Work Ethic (tip#2)
Screenwriting from Massachusetts
Screenwriting da Chicago Way

Scott W. Smith

 

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The thing that often gets lost when we talk about the outstanding career of writer/director Billy Wilder is the contribution of screenwriter Charles Brackett who wrote 13 films together with Wilder. Brackett won three Oscar awards over the years, as well as a lifetime achievement award from the Academy in 1959. 

Brackett was 14 years older than Wilder and brought a considerable amount of clout to the writing table. He had graduated from Williams College and Harvard Law School, he wrote short stories, novels, and was a drama critic for the The New Yorker from 1924-29, and Hollywood took notice buying some of his stories in the 1920s until he finally moved to L.A. when he was 34 years old. 

But according to Sam Staggs the results were less than grand.  “Like many writers from the East, he distained the studio assemble line approach to writing. So he went home. Soon, however, Paramount’s blandisments lurned him to Hollywood again, and in 1932 he signed a contract with that studio as a staff writer. Some half dozen scripts followed, not one of them noteworthy, until someone at Paramount had the crazy-brilliant idea of caging Brackett with Wilder.”

The refined, educated Brackett mixed with the street smart Jewish immigrant from Europe made for an interesting mix, lots of fights and they wrote a heck of a lot of great movies including The Lost Weekend, A Foreign Affair, Ninotchka along with Sunset Boulevard. For whatever reason Sunset Boulevard was the last script they wrote together. After the break-up Brackett won another Oscar as one of the writers on 1954 film version of Titanic.

In 1938-39 Brackett was the president of the Screen Writers Guild and from 1949-1955 he was the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He died in 1969 in Beverly Hills and was buried in Saratoga Springs, New York where he was born in 1892.

Brackett’s grandson, Jim Moore, has a website dedicated to his grandfather called The Charles Brackett Project.

Scott W. Smith

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