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Posts Tagged ‘Ed Thomas’

“A co-worker of mine was raving about him, and I had never met him or seen his work, and I said, ‘What’s the big deal about Scott Duncan?'”
Natalie Jowett
Producer—ESPN/Maggie Vision

Here are three more videos to give you a glimpse into Scott Duncan and his creative world. The first video is an overview of a shoot he did on the impact Nelson Mandela had in South Africa, the second is a little closer to home that Scott shot in Parkersburg, Iowa, about the legacy of high school football coach Ed Thomas. ( Ed Thomas Family Foundation.) And the third video is a mini documentary that Scott was the DP on and features Bono and the U2 gang joined by the Soweto Gospel Choir.

P.S. Scott Duncan does have a blog. And I want to give a shout out to the web design and e-commerce group Spinutech who did the website for The Ed Thomas Foundation (and who I work closely with via River Run Productions here in Cedar Falls).

Scott W. Smith

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Since I wasn’t able to go to the Aplington-Parkersburg game last night I thought I’d drive out this morning and see the what remnants were left behind from the first ever high school football game from Iowa to be broadcast on ESPN. The only activity was a couple joggers running around the track.

The only hint production-wise was a large Musco lighting truck. Musco is an Iowa-based company whose large lighting set-ups provide temporary and permanent  lighting for everything from the last presidential inauguration, features films such as Pearl Harbor, the Daytona Speedway , and currently the 2009 Little League World Series.

But there was the Ed Thomas field. Named after the long time coach of the Aplington-Parkersburg team who died a few months ago. The nickname of the field is “The Sacred Acre” and I think ESPN broadcasting the game last night as a tribute to Coach Thomas will cement in the minds of the American public that town as a symbol of what’s good about this country.

Thomas was already a well-respected icon in Iowa before his death. He was the eighth winningest coach in the the history of Iowa football and currently has four players in the NFL. That’s an impressive number since there are schools around this county who have never had in their school’s history a total of four players in the NFL. What’s more amazing is the school has less than 280 students and the population of the town of Parkersburg is smaller than some high school’s in this county.

So what sets this program apart? Books will be written about that in the future. Aplington-Parkersburg is not really a football factory. It never was intended to be one. But here are a few quotes from Coach Thomas taken from an interview I found at Momentum Media that give a hint of what made him a special person.

“I’ve always said my job is not to prepare our kids to be college athletes. My job is to make football a learning experience, and there are so many things they can learn from being a part of our team that will help them be successful later in life as a father, member of a church, or member of the community. There are so many intangibles we can teach that they can take with them.”

On a leadership class he taught to senior players:

“I talk about leaders setting an example, the responsibility of being a leader, and the idea of being a servant and a giver. I talk about standing up to do what is right when nobody else will, and letting other players know when they’re doing something wrong. I also explain the importance of being a role model—that leaders have to set the tone for other players to follow. I talk about the respect that they have to gain with other young people. I tell them that everyone might not always like you, but you should act in such a way that they respect you.”

When asked about how he defined ethics as it related to coaching:

“Ethics is doing what’s right. It’s following the rules, and teaching football the way it ought to be played. Ethics is teaching young people about sportsmanship and how to conduct themselves in a first-class fashion regardless of whether they win or lose. I tell our kids that we’re going to go out and play hard, and we want to win as much as anybody. But when the game is over, we’re going to line up, shake hands, and be gentlemen, knowing that we did the very best we could. To me, that’s all part of ethics.”

Scott W. Smith

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It’s not everyday that ESPN broadcasts nationally a from a high school in small town in Iowa. In fact, I don’t think it’s ever happened before anywhere in Iowa. But it’s happening tonight in Parkersburg, Iowa just 20 miles from where I live in Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Parkersburg,of course, would rather not be in this position. It’s not that they mind the $7 million production semi coming to town or the ESPN staff that is spending a little money along the way. It’s the real life story of why ESPN is in town today that the people of Parkersburg would rather not have had to have gone through.

Just over a year ago a F-5 rated tornado hit the town of Parkersburg claiming the lives of several people and a chunk of the town’s homes. But they came together as a community and began the rebuilding process. A big part of helping that  process was Ed Thomas, the long time head coach of the Aplington-Parkersburg football team. Already a legend in the state of Iowa for his more than thirty years as a coach as well as currently having four players in the NFL.

Then the unthinkable happened when a troubled youth shot and killed coach Thomas a few months ago in the school weight room. How much suffering does a town have to live through? So tonight will be the first game in 34 years where Ed Thomas will not be on the sidelines coaching the A-P Falcons. Hopefully this night will mark a turning point for the town as they, along with a national audience, remember a man who dedicated his life to his students and players.

To learn more about Coach Ed Thomas check out the site that my buddies at Spin-U-Tech launched this week for the Ed Thomas Family Foundation.

I wish I could be at the game tonight but I am freelance field producing for the ABC show The Doctors this evening. Sure seems like a good deal of film & TV activity going on these days in Iowa. 

Here’s the post I wrote a couple months ago on Coach Thomas, A Sacred Story from Parkersburg.

 

Scott W. Smith

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“I’m one of those coaches who believes it’s my responsibility to be there for my players—my students—any way I can.”
Ed Thomas

That kind of thing isn’t supposed to happen in a place like this.

Highly regarded and admired high school football coaches are not supposed to be killed. Icons of a community are not supposed to be shot. Especially in a small town in Iowa. But that’s what happened yesterday when Aplington-Parkersburg High School football coach Ed Thomas was shot and killed.

When I moved to Cedar Falls, Iowa from Orlando six year ago I didn’t think I was moving to a place free from crime. The end of the innocence happened long before this. It even happened before Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood where he chronicled murder in a small Kansas town in 1959. But yesterday’s shooting is still a shocking tragedy.

Parkesburg, Iowa is 20 miles west of Cedar Falls and was in the news one year ago due to the devastation of an EF 5 rated tornado that hit there last year. A couple days after the tornado destroyed about a third of homes (including Thomas’ home) and took several lives I was hired by an insurance company to video tape the damage. It was unlike anything I had ever seen before.

A few weeks ago that same company hired me to go back and help tell the stories of how some people had helped rebuild their lives. It was amazing to see the transformation that had taken place in just one year.

And symbolically at the center of the town’s transformation was the Aplington-Parkersburg High School football program lead by CoachThomas. ESPN did a feature last fall on Thomas and the team and how much they meant to the town. Reporter Steve Cyphers’ ESPN story called  The Scared Acre is a moving story. It really underscores the tragedy and loss of the death of Thomas. (If you click the ESPN link you will have to put up with an ad before the video plays.)

As a coach he had 292 wins, two state titles, and was the 2005 NFL High Football Coach of the year. Currently there are four NFL players who played under Thomas. Four players from the same high school is a staggering number considering some high schools have never had a single player in their entire history make it to the NFL.

A couple years ago columnist Bob McClellan pointed out that the city of Miami, Florida with its 40 high schools only had four active players in the NFL. To see the same number from the same school and from a small town of 2,000 people has to make you wonder if the coach has tapped into something special.

Thomas at Aplington-Parkersburg for 34 years and was a respected coach, teacher, and mentor as well as a man of faith whose concern for his players went beyond the football field.

“Aside from my own father and mother, no one had a more profound impact on my life than Coach Thomas…He truly epitomized everything that is great about high school football and all the things it can teach young men. Heaven just got a great football coach and an even better man.”
Jared Devries
Detroit Lions Defensive end

One of the top ten all time posts for Screenwriting from Iowa is called Don’t Waste Your Life.  In that post I quoted many well known screenwriters reflecting on their work and life and I used last year’s tornado as a springboard for that discussion. I even had a picture of the scoreboard from Aplington-Parkersburg High School that was blown down during the 200 mile per hour winds.

The death of Ed Thomas will no doubt be felt by the people and town of Parkersburg for a long time. But more importantly I believe the life of Ed Thomas will have a more profound and lasting effect.

Check out the ESPN story on Thomas because it’s a great example of where storytelling and meaning come together.

Don’t waste your life.

8/28/09 Update: ESPN in Parkersburg, Iowa.  They’re broadcasting tonight  nationally A-P’s first  high school football game in 34 years without Coach Thomas on the sidelines.

Scott W. Smith

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