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Posts Tagged ‘Canon 7D’

“You’ll be unstoppable if you become technical as well as creative.”
Producer/director/editor/cameraman/etc. Robert Rodriguez

Most of the people who have seen The Social Network are not even aware that it was shot digitally on the RED camera. Nor do they care. But back in 2003 when someone talked about shooting a feature film with an HD camera they were seen as somewhere between suspect and delusional. (This was four years before the RED camera would even be released.)

But way back in July 2003, Robert Rodriguez gave a talk at the Cary Grant Theater at Sony Pictures Studios on his experiences of shooting Once Upon a Time in Mexico with the Sony F900*—a HD camera that George Lucas had introduced to him;

“One of the benefits of being outside of Hollywood—one of the reasons I think like this (shooting digitally) has to do with the fact that I don’t live here. Because (in Texas) you’re so removed you get to examine (how films are made) and say, ‘That doesn’t really make sense for us out here. Let’s do what makes sense.’ And you find a whole other way of shooting.  And that’s one of the best things you can do for yourself even if you work here (LA). Try to get a birds-eye view of things and really question it and you’ll start coming up with different ways of doing things that work.”
Robert Rodriguez

Hat tip to Go Into The Story for posting the videos of Rodriguez’s talk.

Fast forward to 2010 and you can see that Rodriguez is still evolving technically. Click here to see the music video Like Romeo and Juliet that Rodriguez shot with two Canon 7D cameras.

*Note, to show how quickly the technology is changing…a Sony F900 (which if I recall correctly, cost new in the $100,00 range) today can be had for around $10,000—or about the same amount of a pimped out Canon 5D these days. (Sort of like the Canon 7D Rodriguez is holding in the above photo.)

Related post: The Outsider Advantage

Scott W. Smith

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“I know everything there is to know about the greatest game ever invented. “
Hoosiers (Dennis Hopper’s character)

Since tonight’s NCAA championship basketball game is an extension of March Madness, I’ve finally posted my March Screenwriting from Iowa video. The game tonight between powerhouse Duke (with several national championship) versus Butler (in their first national title appearance) has been called Hoosiers II. Not only because Butler is the smaller school going up against the well established program, but because part of the movie Hoosiers was actually shot in the Butler gym in Indianapolis, Indiana.

You know the ending part of the movie where little Hickory High School walks into the big gym and the players are in awe. And the coach (played by Gene Hackman) takes a tape measure to show the players that the rim is the same height as their little gym back home. They go on to pull off an upset victory in the closing seconds.

Hoosiers was released in November of  1986 and who knows how many basketball players have watched it for inspiration. Butler forward Gordon Hayward said, “I can’t really tell you how many times I’ve watched that movie. I think everyone growing up in Indiana watches that movie. I’ve lost count.”

And a fitting quote to tie-in screenwriting with basketball comes from Geoffrey Fletcher who reportedly wrote thousands of pages before his work finally made its way to the screen in the movie Precious: Based on a Book by Sapphire.

“I watch, say Michael Jordan play and he makes it look quite easy, but we never see all the hours, and hours, and hours of years of practice beforehand. So when people ask me if writing Precious was difficult (to write), well certainly it was. The subject matter…we have a semi-literate character telling us the story. But a lot of the difficulty was writing all of those pages of original material before I got this opportunity.”
Oscar-Winning screenwriter Geoffrey Fletcher
wga.com interview

PS. One of the great things about the new HDSLR cameras is that shooting videos with it opens up new opportunites. I bought the Nikon D90 which was the first HDLS released that shot HD video. I took it with me to the Northern Iowa gym to take some still photos for the above video and ended up thinking, “why not shoot a little video while I’m here.” So other than the greenscreen opening section that was shot on Panasonic HPX 170, I shot all the photos and video with the Nikon D90. It doesn’t take much surfing on the web to see many high quality short narrative films and videos that are being made with this new jump in technology. (Just did some test shooting with the very popular Canon 7D last week and that camera is solid.)I haven’t heard of a feature being made with a HDSLR yet, but I’m sure that’s just around the corner.

Related Posts:
Storytelling from Indiana

The King of Cool’s Roots

Why Do We Love Underdog Stories?

Scott W. Smith


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