Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous’ Category

Read Full Post »

Though Photoshop World 2019 in Orlando ended a few days ago I’m just getting to my final post on the conference because I had a Photoshop hangover. After the last session I attended I was walking in the large hallway to leave and happened to run into Scott Kelby and meet him for the first time.

He and his company Kelby One have been putting on Photoshop World conferences for 20 years now and I’ve had read many of Kelby’s books over the years. As well as learned a lot from his online videos.

But one of Kelby’s great legacies is raising up other photographers turned educators. Three people that he’s brought to my attention that I’ve learned greatly from are Joe McNally, Zack Arias, and Jeremy Cowart.  If you need a creative jolt check out anything you can find on these guys.

Here’s a Zack Arias classic from 2009:

And if you’re a content creator who has focused on the video side—and would like to get more involved in still photography and Lightroom and Photography then check out Scott Kelby’s educational material.

P.S. On a similar note, I’m listening to the audio version of Like Brothers by filmmakers  Mark Duplass and Jay Duplass and they’ve also done a super job of raising up other filmmakers to follow in their path.

Related Posts:
Back to School—with Scott Kelby

Scott W. Smith

 

Read Full Post »

One of the classes I attended today at Photoshop World Orlando was given by New York model turned photographer Peter Hurley who specializes in headshots.

Here are a couple of his YouTube videos with over six millions of views just on two basic techniques that will help with your headshots—no matter what side of the camera you’re on.

Hurley wrote the book on headshots—literally. It’s called The Headshot: The Secret to Creating Amazing headshot Portraits. 

Screen Shot 2019-05-31 at 10.28.53 PM.png

Hurley has also been featured on a TED talk.

Related post:
Back to School—with Scott Kelby 

Scott W. Smith

 

 

Read Full Post »

“Train your mind to see ordinary things is a unique way.”
Lindsay Adler

Screen Shot 2019-05-31 at 12.59.32 AM.png

Gone with the Wind

I went to several workshops today at Photoshop World Orlando 2019 including an inspirational talk by New York fashion photographer Lindsay Adler. Here are two online videos she mentioned that show how some of her work was influenced by Hollywood. One being the movie Gone with the Wind, and the other being the TV show Westworld. (And why not toss nod to the classic old Hollywood glamour photographer George Hurrell.)

And if you’re interested in pursing a career in photographer her’s a talk Adler gave last year that unpacks the road she took in developing her style and building her career.

Scott W. Smith

 

 

Read Full Post »

Today was my first day attending Photoshop World Orlando 2019 and I took a four hour workshop with Adobe Evangelist Terry White. If you’re a content creator looking for some free tutorials on Photoshop, Lightroom, InDesign, etc.  check out Terry’s YouTube channel (and join his 464,000+ subscribers).

 

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

Dust to Dust

“Earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust”
From the funeral service in the Book of Common Prayer

The memorial service for my mother was held Saturday in the historic chapel part of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Maitland, Florida.  It was led by The Rev. Cameron MacMillian and was a beautiful and sacred time. I’ll just leave a few photos I took after the service to tell part of the story.

IMG_3074.JPG

IMG_3108

IMG_3106.JPG

IMG_3077.JPG

IMG_E3083.JPG

IMG_3087.JPG

IMG_3058.JPG

IMG_3060

IMG_3094.JPG

IMG_E2992

Scott W. Smith

 

Read Full Post »

My mother was tough.

valenciafilm12052019_8-copy.jpg

Sue Stautner doesn’t look tough in this photo. But she was tough.

She was born in the middle of the Great Depression and a chunk of her youth was taken up with the scarcity of the effects of a world at war. Those raised during the Depression and World War II were engrained with an exceptionally particular view that economic turmoil was always on the horizon and my mother was no different.

And despite my mother’s father having a job in advertising at National Cash Register (NCR) during those times of high unemployment he was an alcoholic. He died of cirrhosis of the liver at age 57. Having an alcoholic father is tougher than tough. It’s a wound.

Happy Mother’s Day, right?

But it is a happy Mother’s Day for me because I recall a woman who endured hardships and went on to have a productive life. I gave my mom her last Mother’s Day card a few days before she died last month.

Before she graduated from Fairview High School in Dayton, Ohio she had played field hockey, was a homecoming queen, and worked at the Dayton radio station WINK where she met comedian Jonathan Winters and humorist Erma Bombeck early in their careers. She also took classes at the Dayton Art Institute. 

 

IMG_2579

She met my father when she was a student at Ohio State University and part of the Delta Gamma Fraternity (Delta Gamma was formed in 1873 when what we commonly call sororities were called women’s fraternities). And to show how tough she really was—she taught art at South Seminole Middle School for 30 years.  Days before she died I saw a woman at Starbucks wearing a shirt that proclaimed “I ain’t scared—I’m a middle school teacher.”

valenciafilm12052019_8.jpg

A student’s creation at South Seminole Middle School

She also raised two kids mostly as a single mother, and mostly on a teacher’s salary. Did I tell you my mom was tough? One year I gave her a Mother’s Day card featuring the iconic World War II art work of J. Howard Miller that originally encouraged women to roll up their sleeves and do wartime jobs in the defense industry.

Screen Shot 2019-05-12 at 8.17.37 AM.png

My mom was strong. And she was also loving, funny, and supportive. Looking back perhaps one of the toughest/loving/supportive things she did was sit through all of my football and baseball games. That’s part of her life spread over a decade just  standing or sitting in the Florida sun watching her son play sports.

My mom went to high school and college in the 1950s which was during the peak of cigarette smoking being cool. She started before the dangers of smoking were widely known, and unfortunately never stopped long after she knew the damage it was doing to her lungs.

 

 

I took the below photo sometime after she turned 80 and shortly before she was wearing oxygen full time due to having COPD. Living and dying with COPD has been called the long goodbye because it can be a long, slow process. For my mom it was a decline of six plus years from when she really began having difficulty breathing.

SueSmithObit_7988.jpg

Over those last six years my mother never missed a chance to tell me that this could be her last Mother’s Day. I knew one of these years she would be correct so I tried to maximize my time with her in person and on the phone.

My mom’s final act of toughness was enduring a month in various hospital rooms, an intensive care unit, and at a physical rehabilitation facility.  She always said she wanted to go peacefully in her sleep and she was able to do just that with her son and daughter on each side of her holding her hands as she took her final breath.

It was a sad and sweet moment. I’m thankful for my mom bringing me into this world and giving me the foundation to live a creative life. And I’m glad my sister and I had the opportunity to help her in the later stages of her life.

Happy Mother’s Day to all the mothers out there. The definition of tough is to “endure a period of hardship or difficulty”—so I think all mothers are tough.

And another group of tough women were the nurses, med-techs, and care workers at the assisted living facility where my mother lived in her later years. They oversaw her medication, brought her food daily when she after she could not longer go to the dining hall for meals, made sure she got her daily paper, joked with her, often has extended conversations with her, and maybe put up with a complaint or two from my mother.

My mother was an avid reader of novels, enjoyed well-done witty Tv shows (Young Sheldon was her recent favorite), and I look forward to watching Cannery Row again because that was one of her all-time favorite films.

It was a tough but human process to watch my mother die. And it will forever shade how I live my life.

P.S. One of the fringe benefits of having someone close to you die is you get to hear stories you never heard before. I just received a phone message from Vivian Hurston Bowden (who is author Zora Neale Hurston’s niece) and she commented on how much she loved my mom and enjoyed working with her at the junior high/middle school.  She also let me that my mom did the decorating for her wedding in Sanford, Florida back in 1971. A long time neighbor of hers told me how my mom bought her little gifts when than woman went through treatment for cancer.  I love hearing those stories.

Scott W. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: