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[Brooklynn Prince] is just so incredible and she worked very closely with Sam [acting coach Samantha Quan], but to tell you the truth with her in particular she is a born thespian. I mean she is really acting. There is a true performance there, a true character that she found. She is wise beyond her years. I just can’t speak more highly of her, and just love her. She just brought so much to the table and I can’t even imagine [The Florida Project] without her. …For the three kids, Brooklyn,  Christopher Rivera, Valeria Cotto,  [Sam] made it a really fun summer camp environment for the kids. It was shot over their summer, so we were taking their summer away from them, so we wanted to give them the best experience possible. And at the end of every day—you have a limited number of hours you can work with children because of child labor laws, so you get to that six hour mark and you have to let them go. And [Brooklynn] would never want to go. Well it’s the law, get out of here [laughs]. I think because it was so much like a family unit. the kids were having fun, they were having workshops, experimenting, that by the time we actually got them in front of the camera they understood their characters enough where if I did have the audacity to ask little six year old to improvise it was fine. They would actually be able to pull it off. And especially Brooklynn. Brooklynn has that innate, genius ability to comedically improvise. Which is incredible at that age.  Near the end of the film, we just spend time eating with her brunch at a higher end hotel that her mother brings her to. And I just wanted to document her eating. Just a series of jump cuts of her eating. What I did was just roll two, thousand foot mags on a 35mm camera so it’s like 20 minutes. And we just watch this girl eat for 20 minutes. And Chris [Bergoch] and I have scripted lines,—we do have a full screenplay— but I encourage improvisation on top of it. So she got through her 15 scripted lines in a minute and a half and we had 18 minutes to burn. So we just ask her questions, what do you think that taste like? What do you wish that tasted like. And sometimes I’m feeding lines to her, or taking her lines—like if she gives me something that’s almost there, I can quickly figure something out with Chris, and deliver the line back to her and she’ll feed it to us. It was wonderful to see her do that. It was like stand-up comedy night. We had 40 cast and crew just watching this little girl eat.”
Sean Baker , director, editor, co-writer on The Florida Project
Filmspotting
 podcast interview #652

I think my favorite line in the movie is when Brooklynn says while eating the she wishes her fork was made of candy so she could eat it when she was done with her meal. Maybe that was a scripted line that she just delivered real, but it felt improvised, fresh, in character and totally something a six year old would say.

Scott W. Smith

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Will one of the results from The Florida Project be the youngest Oscar nominee ever, and the first Instagram star to receive an Oscar-nomination? Time will tell.

“Casting is one of the most important things—if not the most important thing for a film like [The Florida Project] that’s character driven. And I said that we are not going to make this film, and production better be prepared to not move forward unless we find our present-day Spanky McFarland. I really was looking for today’s Spanky. It took a while to find Brooklyn. Brooklynn Prince is her name and she was a local hire. I wanted kids to be from the Orlando/Kissimmee area, it was important for me. For their accents and etc. I just really felt that we should be casting the kids locally. So they could go home at night and feel comfortable in their environment. 

And she was in the database of a local casting company. She had done some commercials.  She had done one small indie. And you know what, I honestly throw her in the same camp as Mickey Rooney, Jodie Foster, I really do feel she’s a born thespian.

[We looked at] a couple hundred perhaps. We put out in a couple counties that we were looking for children and they didn’t have to have prior experience. We were looking for personas. And I was also doing my street casting at the same time. We were closer to production. I was living down there [in Central Florida] so I was going through Walmart, I was going through Target and that’s were I found Valeria [Cotto] . I saw this little girl with striking red hair and I went up to her mother and said we’re hold auditions please have her come in. She came in, she really impressed us and she turned out to be five years old which cut two hours off our day, but she was worth it. We made production adjust to that. 

And there’s a whole new world, a whole new way of casting these days.  I’ve used social media in the past with Tangerine. Using Vine and You Tube to find castSo Bria [Vinaite] we found her on Instagram. My financiers allowed me to take this risk and roll the dice. She was green, yet enthusiastic and very motivated. She came down a month early and also worked with my acting coach Samantha Quan [@SamanthaQuan] and she got to that place where I believe she was holding her own with Willem [Defoe] by the second weekend. I’m just so proud of her. Mela Murder who plays Ashley in the film came from a short film called Gang that I saw on Vimeo that I thought she was amazing in. She has quite a range. And then there’s the conventional ways of casting and that’s how Willem came into this picture. That’s how Calab Landry Jones  came to us through the agencies.”
Director/Writer/Editor Sean Baker on casting The Florida Project
The Director’s Cut podcast interview with Paul Schrader produced by the DGA

Related posts:
The Florida Project
The Cinematic and Journalistic Roots of The Florida Project

Scott W. Smith

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It’s a world of laughter
A world of tears
It’s a world of hopes
And a world of fears
There’s so much that we share
That it’s time we’re aware
It’s a small world after all
It’s a Small World —Walt Disney World

Last year Moonlight won the Oscar for Best Picture and I expect The Florida Project to at least get nominated for a Best Picture Oscar this year. The odd connection there is not only were both films set and shot in Florida (Moonlight in Miami/Liberty City where the main area code is 407, and The Florida Project (Orlando/Kissimmee where the main area code is 407), but the distributor for both films is A24.

Is A24 scouring Tampa, Jacksonville, Apalachicola for the next Florida story they can bring to light? Are they regular Twitter followers of the @FloridaMan_?

But for an entertainment company that’s only been around for five years they have an impressive track recording including some of their better known films; Swiss Army Man, Room, and The Lobster.  And they still have a movie coming out this year that is also getting Oscar buzz, Lady Bird. 

Now that I think about it, one of A24’s first films was Spring Breakers (2013) which was shot in St. Petersburg area so they definitely have a Florida thing going on.

And why not, they’re just tapping into a great tradition. What’s often at the top of the greatest film of all time list? Citizen Kane, which is a story set where? Right, in Florida. And often at the top of the all time greatest comedies is what? Right, Some Like it Hot. Yes, also a story set in Florida.

Filmmaker Sean Baker was asked why he thought his film The Florida Project was getting more attention than his previous five films and he wasn’t 100% sure. But he had some ideas.

“I think A24 is a major part it. A24 has a pedigree right now. People are looking for A24 as a place where they can see great films. Not that mine is a great film, but I’m just saying that all the other films that A24 puts out are great. So I think that people are expecting a certain thing from them. They’ve very strategic with the way that their films are put out there. With our film they are doing a platform release—it’s almost on its fourth or fifth week now. New York, L.A. and we’ve slowly opened in other markets and allowed world of month to take place. So there’s that word of mouth thing that’s happening which is great.”
Director/editor/writer Sean Baker
The Radio Dan Show
November 7, 2017

Which brings us to Drake. The Rapper, not the school. Drake used to have a home in the 305 but these days Toronto is his home base where he feels more grounded. (The 406 according to a Google search.) Anyway, the rapper is moving into TV and movies with his debut as producer being The Carter Effect, about basketball player Vince Carter.  (Carter played high school ball in Daytona Beach, Florida. See a theme here?)

“Days before Carter Effect debuted, Drake attended a private screening of A24’s The Florida Project and became obsessed with the Sean Baker-helmed film about a destitute mom and her 6-year-old daughter living in the shadows of Disney World. ‘That was one of my favorite things I’d seen in a long time, just because it taught me something about a world I would never think of and what it was like to live there. It was just very pure and very human,’ he says.

“Though neither side would divulge exactly what they are collaborating on, A24 production head Noah Sacco says it encompasses both film and TV. “When we spoke with them, they articulated their passion for shepherding new voices. We look at what they’ve achieved in the music industry. And it made a lot of sense to us,” says Sacco. “We found that we saw eye to eye very quickly.”
The Hollywood Reporter 11/8/17
Drake’s Hotline to Hollywood by Atiana Siegel 

So look for an A24/Drake collaboration down the road. Now if you want to see a photo of Drake at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa (the 515) now—here it is:

drake-university

P.S. Speaking of the 305 and the 407 did you know that in college football the Miami Hurricanes are currently 8-0 and ranked 7th in the country in the AP poll and the University of Central Florida is 8-0 and ranked 14th. From the fun connection file; Miami’s head coach, Mark Richt, was the quarterback behind Jim Kelly when I was a walk-on football player at Miami. And UCF’s coach, Scott Frost, back in 2007 was an assistant at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, Iowa where I was living at the time. And where I was living when I launched this blog in 2008.

Scott W. Smith

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Sean Baker is officially the poster filmmaker for Screenwriting from Iowa…and Other Unlikely Places this year.  Here’s an abridged version of what I wrote years ago, “I believe there are many great stories waiting to be told outside of L.A. …I hope this blog  helps you tell those stories and encourages you, especially if you feel like you live in an unusual place in the middle-of-nowhere.” That could be West Des Moines, West Africa, or even West Hollywood (where Baker calls home these days.)

Baker grew up in New Jersey enjoying big Hollywood movies like Die Hard, RoboCop (1987), and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. This is the twist in the road that’s led him to making six non-big Hollywood feature films over the past 20 years including The Florida Project:

At the tail end of high school and beginning of my four years at NYU, I was gravitating toward independent films — the work of Spike Lee, Jim Jarmusch, Richard Linklater, and Steven Soderbergh. Just being in NYC was a film education on its own. I’d go to MoMA, Lincoln Center, Anthology Film Archives, and all these great New York art theaters that played the best of world cinema and independent film, and I started falling in love with movies that leaned more on human stories than special effects. By the time I graduated NYU, I understood that I couldn’t afford to go out and make an action blockbuster like Die Hard as my first film. And creatively, my love for independent movies was leading me someplace different.”
Writer/director/editor Sean Baker
Wealthsimple

Spike Lee, Jim Jarmusch, Richard Linklater, and Steven Soderbergh have all been covered on this blog over the years. Of those filmmakers the one film that I think has some crossover to The Florida Project is Jarmusch’s Stranger than Paradise, which was shot partially in Florida and entirely in master shots.

Another independent film that comes to mind that has a connection to The Florida Project (and that’s off most people’s radar) is Ulee’s Gold (1997). That film by writer/director Victor Nunez is as the trailer says, “The story of a family on the edge.” It was the first film I recall showing the gritty side of Orlando. And Peter Fonda received an Oscar-nomination for his performance, as I think Willem Dafoe will in The Florida Project.

Scott W. Smith

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The thing I try to instill in students is like the only thing you have to offer is you. Your individual stories, your individual perception, your individual humanity, and figuring out a way to communicate that humanity to humanity at large—that’s the beauty of cinema once again, that you can have a six-year-old Iranian girl, or a 90-year-old British gentleman, and you can have an equal emotional experience if the filmmaker does their job right to it.

For me it would be a ballerina [Black Swan] and a wrestler [The Wrestler]—can I make you feel in their blood and their pain. That’s the goal. Because that’s one of the great things cinema does—is to bring us into other human experiences.”
Screenwriter/Director Darren Aronofsky  (mother!
Podcast interview with Tim Ferriss (At 53 minute mark when Ferriss asked Aronofsky about advice for filmmakers who don’t fit in the widget factory )

Related posts:
The Greatest [Cinematic] Invention of the 2oth Century (According to Darren Aronofsky)
40 Days of Emotions

Scott W. Smith

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JenniferL-mother.png

Jennifer Lawrence in mother!

The following excerpt was pulled from a two hour podcast interview with filmmaker Darren Aronofsky as he talked about his film mother! (and the creative process and more) with Tim Ferriss.

Tim: What do you want the experience of your audience to be, or what do you want them to take away from any one of your films?

Darren: I guess I start off with the first rule of filmmaking is to never bore an audience. That is the worst feeling and experience when I’m watching a movie and my mind is wandering and looking at the colors splatter across the screen. I think you always want to engage an audience, not just visually, not just through sound, but emotionally. So I think that’s number one, to just give people an engaging emotional experience for two hours—whatever your running time is. And on top of that hopefully this you can layer in some ideas so that when people leave the theater people it’s not like 15 minutes later “What did we watch?” I don’t want to be the McDonald’s of movies where it’s just the wrapper all that’s left over. I want me to be thinking a bit and talking about it….You want to have an impact. In today’s landscape a lot of things are disposable. 

Tim: You mentioned emotional engagement— what are some of the ingredients that help create that?

Darren: It starts with the greatest invention of the 20th century that’s overlooked—which is the close-up. That’s the great thing about cinema —that you can stick a camera right in the face of Paul Newman—on those beautiful blue eyes. And you can go right into his soul, and when you you project it months later to an audience, or years later—potentially centuries later— you are anonymous in that audience, yet you can feel the empathy….In a movie, via the close-up,  you can be unconscious and fully be  in Paul Newman’s head. Even though you don’t know  exactly what he’s thinking, you can sort of study him and steal that thought. And that to me that’s the greatness of cinema.”

TheSting

Paul Newman in The Sting

P.S. Looking forward to seeing mother! tonight.

Related posts:
“Don’t Bore the Audience!” (Richard Walter)
Stop Making Soul-less Movies 
Hollywood Hacks & Shipwrecks
“Winter’s Bone” (Debra Granik)

Scott W. Smith

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Actor Harry Dean Stanton grew up on a farm in Kentucky, served in the Navy and was stationed in the Pacific during WWII, studied at the Pasadena Playhouse, once recorded a song with Bob Dylan, was a roommate of Jack Nicholson before they both became name actors, and acted along side Paul Newman and Marlon Brando.

Stanton started in theater and his first IMDB credit is for Inner Sanctum in 1954. He’d go on to become one of the great character actors working on Cool Hand Luke, The Godfather II, Escape from New York, Repo Man, Paris, Texas and when he died ten days ago at age 91 his film Lucky was playing in theaters.

He had a film and TV career that spanned  over 60 year and over that time worked with the a who’s who of great directors including Francis Ford Coppola, Sam PeckinpahJohn Milius, Wim Wenders, Arthur Penn, Norman Jewison, and David Lynch.

On a podcast interview with Marc Maron Stanton was a man of few words, but I did think there were a few nuggest in there including this brief exchange:

Marc Maron: What makes a guy a good director?
Harry Dean Stanton: Leave the actors alone. 

P.S. Two films I’d recommend of Stanton’s if you haven’t seen them are Paris, Texas written by Sam Shepard and The Straight Story (which mostly takes place in Iowa). I haven’t seen Sophia Huber’s documentary Harry Dean Stanton: Partly, but it’s on my short list.

Related posts:
Sam Shepard (1943-2017)
David Lynch in Iowa

Scott W. Smith

 

 

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