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Archive for July, 2014

“To speak technically, photography is the art of writing with light.”
Gerardo Suter 

“I think that you should make as much film as you possibly can —long and short. But I don’t think it’s smart to start screenwriting without at least having carried a camera around. I really think you have to teach yourself to see the world cinematically in order to write cinematically. The thing I think that’s poorly understood about screenwriting from people who aren’t close to the film business is that screenwriters don’t just write the dialogue, we don’t just make up the story and structure the dramatic beats, but we also describe the images on the page which are then transferred into film images by everybody else. And carrying a camera, which I did for many years, really taught me to see the world in terms of photographs. It gave me a leg up in terms of learning to write visually.”
 Writer/director Robin Swicord (The Jane Austen Book Club)
The Dialogue Interview: Learning from the Masters interview with Jay Fernandez  (Part 1)

Related post:

John Ford’s Advice to Spielberg
Descriptive Writing—Part 1 (Tip #22)
Descriptive Writing—Part 2 (Tip #23)
Descriptive Wriitng—Pt. 5, Setting (Tip #26)
10 Cinematography Tips (Roger Deakins)
Cinematography & Emotions

Recommended Book: The Visual Story by Bruce Block

Recommended Website: The American Society of Cinematography (ASC)

P.S. I didn’t attended Vincent Laforet’s Directing Motion Workshop that toured the country the last three months, but the trailer looks great. And it’s available as a digital download and DVD. (I’m trying to get my hands on the material to review.)

Scott W. Smith

 

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“I started writing ever since I could pick up a pencil, but I had been orientated to novels and short stories because that’s what we studied in school. I really didn’t know movies were written until I was probably about 20-years-old.
Screenwriter Robin Swicord

Chances are good that even if you live in a small town in North America you have quite a bit of access to learning about the screenwriting and filmmaking processes. But if you were in a small town in the United States back in the 1970s—and even if you attended a college like Florida State University in Tallahassee—you didn’t have access to cable TV, DVDs with writer and director commentaries, movies streamed online, screenwriting blogs, or even that many books on the screenwriting/filmmaking process. (Syd Field’s classic book on screenwriting didn’t even come put until 1979.)

Yet that’s where Oscar-nominated screenwriter Robin Swicord (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button) came from on her way to writing Little Women and Memoirs of a Geisha. She worked as a photographer to pay her way through college and then started to think she could write screenplays.

“I was intimidated. I didn’t have a teacher and I didn’t know how to get started. And it was that thing of being in a small town and knowing that there’s a big world out there, and not knowing quite how to get out of that small town and go to the big world knowing that I wanted to write for film but I’d never met a filmmaker. So there was a period of self invention were I was trying to figure stuff out. Then there weren’t things that are so available now; all the books on structure, interview series like this where you hear writers talking about their work—just being able to go in an rent a DVD and study one filmmaker’s work.”
Robin Swicord
The Dialogue interview with Jay Fernandez (Part 1)

But the road to Hollywood began for Swicord in Northwest Florida where her photography skills led to some corporate production work in Atlanta for IBM, which led to IBM asking their ad agency in New York if they’d hire Swicord as a copywriter and they did. That got her to New York City where she began to met people in the film business. She was told the best chance a female has to work in the film industry was to be a script supervisor, but her goal was screenwriting.

“I got in touch with some people who had gone to Florida State a little bit after me who were in New York City and hoping to start a theater. And I said, ‘I’ll write a play for you.’ I wrote this play called Last Days at the Dixie Girl Cafe, and we had like $500 between us and we rented the theater and we put an ad in Backstage magazine. And actors showed up and auditioned and then we were in business….I was lucky in that the director of that is a good dramaturge—her name was Lynn Thomson*. She was teaching directing at  playwriting at Hunter College and she taught me a lot about writing plays. And a lot of it gets taught to you by actors in the rehearsal process.

“It had a nice opening and moved to off-Broadway and investors found it and so forth and through that an agent saw it and got in touch with me and said, ‘Did you ever consider writing for film?’ And I gave her my first screenplay Stock Cars for Christ. 

“I was completely mid-twenties just trying to figure out my own path to get there. I sold a screenplay and stepped into the most remarkable situation that I call ‘learn while you earn.’ I was paid by MGM to rewrite my screenplay endlessly under the tutelage of a wonderful development executive who patiently let me find my way to decent structure. It was an uncommon experience for a beginning screenwriter and I know how lucky I was.”
Robin Swicord

Swicord is a great example of embracing your limitations and just starting somewhere. Her photography skills were good enough to get her a job that helped pay her way through school where she was an English and Drama major—but also had access to watching films while waiting for her film to develop back in the darkroom. Those skills led to doing corporate films for IMB in Atlanta and that led her to New York City where she connected with people from her college who were starting a theater. She wrote a play for them that got her expose to learning from the director and the actors. The play got noticed, got her an agent, which led to her selling a screenplay and launching her career.

*Lynn M. Thomson went on to work as a dramaturge on Rent (Broadway), and she’s currently the Professor of Dramaturgy and American Theater at Brooklyn College.

P.S. “An agent read the play [Last Days at the Dixie Girl Cafe] and asked me if I would like to write for film. I gave her my first screenplay, Stock Cars For Christ, and she sold it to MGM. MGM sent me a plane ticket and moved me into the Del Capri Hotel in L.A. and rented me a pink typewriter so I could rewrite the screenplay (a total of nine drafts!)—which of course was never made into a film.” Robin Swicord, From Book to Screen Interview

Related posts:
Start Small…But Start Somewhere
Screenwriting Quote #139 (Robin Swicord)
Screenwriting Quote #155 (Robin Swicord)

Scott W. Smith 

 

 

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“My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.”
LaBron James
Sports Illustrated 7/11/14

“Unless you are hardhearted or a Miami Heat season-ticket holder, this is tough not to love.”
Jason Gay on LeBron James returning to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers
NY Times

“James seems to be following a higher calling with this move. We can’t help but admire his devotion to Flyover Land.”
Rolling Stone article by Jeff Allen 

Years ago when screenwriter Joe Eszterhas moved  from Hollywood to the Cleveland area people thought he was crazy. Now that basketball great LeBron James is moving from Miami to the Cleveland area, it looks like this is just a new hip trend. (Kind of like those artists I keep reading and hearing about who are moving from places like New York City to Detroit.)

“Yeah, I think if you’re off the beaten path in any way it’s always tough. I’ve been off the beaten path my whole life.”
Hollywood screenwriter/Ohio resident Joe Eszterhas
The Hollywood Interview

The sun is in fact shinning brighter this week in Northeast Ohio. Property value in Akon probably went up 2% in the last few days since the world’s greatest basketball player announced he was returning to his home state to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers.

The odds are slim that anyone from Team LeBron ever read my post Fueling Your Imagination, which was about filmmaker Jim Jarmusch who was from Akron, Ohio. But this is what I wrote on June 20, 2010 when James was thinking about leaving Cleveland:

The Akron-Cleveland has changed a lot since Jarmusch was a kid (and even when he shot part of Stranger in Paradise there in the 80s) and I’d like to think that the next Jim Jarmuschs from the area, like current NBA MVP LeBron James, stay in their hometown and do their thing for the world to see.

So it took a LeBron a few years to come around, but I’m glad he’s going to play for his hometown crowd again. (He won two NBA championships playing for the Miami Heat so I don’t think he has any regret leaving.) But he’s now done the Rocky Balboa thing where he’s redefined winning. You remember in Rocky where he realizes he can’t beat Apollo Creed so he redefines winning as just being able to do something that no other boxer has done, and that’s to go the distance—all 15 rounds—with the champ. So at the end of the film even though Rocky loses the spilt decision, in a sense he’s a winner.

LeBron James is refining his vision.

“When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission. I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasn’t had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But what’s most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.”
LeBron James

Northeast Ohio has a special place in my heart because it’s where my father was from, and my grandfather worked for more than 30 years at Youngstown Sheet & Tube. (YS&T was Ohio’s largest employer in the 1930s.)

The area now has had its share of economic problems. LeBron alone won’t be a cure all, but with Heisman Trophy winning QB Johnny Manziel being drafted by the Cleveland Browns just a few months ago, Northeast Ohio is on the upswing and is enjoying its moment in the spotlight.

In honor of LeBron heading home to Ohio, I’ve decided to pull together all my Ohio-centered posts over the years. And there are a lot of them. You may be surprised that  screenwriters Mark Boal, Dudley Nichols, Ernest R. Tidyman, Rod Serling, Willima Golman, and actors Cary Grant, Tom Hanks, Jennifer Garner, and Paul Newman, as well as directors Chris Columbus and Jonathan Demme and former Disney head Michael Eisner  all have roots in Ohio.

The Superman from Cleveland
The Lucky Slob from Ohio
Toy Story 3’s Ohio Connection
Rod Serling’s Ohio Epiphany
From Poland, Ohio to a 155-Foot Yach
The Thinking Person’s Playwrights
The Oberlin Express
Oberlin to Oscars
Jailbait, Rejection & Screenwriter Mark Boal’s Start
Screenwriter Dudley Nichols (1895-1960)
Shoot for the Moon
The Original Screenwriting Rock Star
Screenwriter Ernest R. Tidyman
Screenwriting from Sunset Blvd.
Screenwriting Quote #61 (Jonathan Winters)
The Real & Creepy Shawshank Prison
Middle-Earth in the Midwest
Directing Non-professional Actors
Before ‘Friday Night Lights’
Project Greenlight 2 (Part 7)
Genius, Madness, and a Genuine Third Act
Emmy-Winning Writer Rick Cleveland
Cleveland Screenwriter Hits ‘Lottery Ticket’
The Weather Started Getting Rough (Two of the Gilligan’s Island cast members were  from Ohio)
Fueling Your Imagination (Jarmusch Style)
Screenwriting Quote #129 (Bob Peterson)
E.T. was from Youngstown (Kinda)
Youngstown’s Hollywood Connection
Son of a Son of a Steelworker
Screenwriting Quote #116 (Chris Columbus)
The Story of Men on the Moon
William Goldman Stands Alone
The Other Scott Smith
Screenwriting Quote #72 (Michael Eisner)
Screenwriting Quote #42 (Brad Anderson)
Screenwriting Quote #29 (William Blinn)
Screenwriting Quote of the Day #23 (John Grogan)

P.S. Cleveland rocks! Check out this interview with Joe Eszterhas where he talks about when he took Jimi Hendrix to a Hungarian restaurant one night in Cleveland.

Scott W. Smith

 

 

 

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photo-5

I started this postcard thing on the blog years ago to give myself a break from writing and researching posts when I was on the road working on various productions. Hard to believe today is the 80th postcard. I’m posting this on the tail end of a long video production day and drive home. One of the perks of a 14+ hour day on the road was the crew was able to eat breakfast at the Over Easy Cafe on Sanibel Island, Florida and dinner at Pinchers Crab Shack in Ft. Myers where I took the above picture overlooking the Caloosahatchee River.

The restaurant is next door to the historic winter estates of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, but that’s not the only history tied to the area.

According to Kimberly Ripley’s blog, “Caloosahatchee means ‘River of the Calusa.’ It searved as the main highway inland to the Calusa Indians…Also known as ‘Shell People’ the later Calusas, from approximately the 1500’s to their demise in the early 1800’s, used seashells as foundations. They built their cities on them.”

P.S. My first postcard (Downtown Kansas City)  was August 11, 201. And for what it’s worth, my 28th postcard (Prime Time) was on a shoot I did with Deion Sanders at his Dallas-area home . The great Pro Football Hall-of-Fame football player was born and raised in Ft. Myers, Florida. To read an interesting article about Sanders’ ties to the area read the Sam Cook article about where “Prime Time” developed his personality. And to come full circle Cook was the sports editor who hired me as a 19-year-old photojournalist when he was the sports editor with the Sanford Herald Evening Herald.  

Scott W. Smith

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amazon

In honor of the 2014 FIFI World Cup Brazil championship game yesterday I decided to dig up a photo I took in Brazil back in ’07. I was part of a team that shot footage in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro (where I bought a Pele jersey) and in Manaus. I took the above shot from a seaplane at the Meeting of the Waters where the Amazon and Rio Negro Rivers meet. Pretty cool Indiana Jones-type experience.

Congrats to Germany for beating Argentina, and congrats to Brazil for pulling off what has to be one of the hardest events to pull off in a peacetime setting.

Scott W. Smith

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“I believe in the affirmation of life. If we lose that hope, if we lose the possibility of it, we’ve lost an awful lot.”
Writer/Director Paul Mazursky
Film Comment 1978 Interview

“I never thought, I’m going against the grain, I’m going to inform America about the problem of women, about society, about the bums on the street. I just thought, is this a good story, and can I make it work? The European directors I love really showed me that. You make the movie you want to make, that engages you, the movie that you have to make. They got away with it for a long time. And I guess I did too.”
Paul Mazursky
TheWrap

Oscar and Emmy nominated Paul Mazursky’s died a couple of weeks ago.  The  career of the producer, director, writer and actor spanned seven decades. I was in film school when his 1982 film Tempest came out and once remember seeing Mazursky walking across W. Olive Ave. in Burbank as I waited at the stoplight next to Warner Bros. Studios. (When you’re 21-years-old and from outside L.A. you don’t forget those Forrest Gump-like moments.)

At that time in his career he already had two Primetime Emmy nominations (The Danny Kaye Show) and  four  Oscar-nominations (writing Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,  Harry & Tonto, An Unmarried Woman— the later also was nominated for Best Picture). But some of his more popular films were still to come including Moscow on the Hudson,  Enemies, A Love Story, and Down and Out in Beverly Hills.

“[Down and Out in Beverly Hillsmade me laugh and harder and more delight than any movie I’ve seen since Lost in America.”
Roget Ebert
1986 movie review on Siskel and Ebert

As an actor he also worked on a wide variety of  films and TV programs; Blackboard Jungle, The Twilight Zone, Antz, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Kung Fu Panda 2.

But when I think of Mazursky, Tempest is what comes to mind first. He directed the film from a script he wrote with Leon Capetanos based on the Shakespeare play.  It won the audience award at the 1982 Toronto International Film Festival.

The reason I link Mazursky to that film is not even the film itself that starred John Cassavetes, Gena Rowlands and Susan Sarandon (and which just happens to be Molly Ringwald’s big screen debut), but because  Mazursky wrote a making of book on the film–fittingly called Paul Mazursky’s Tempest.

Keep in mind that in 1982 there was no Internet so behind the scene books were a key place to get a glimpse into the filmmaking process. I still have my copy of that book. Here’s a couple of shots from the book that may help you in scheduling your film.

photo-4

photo-3

The Director’s Guild of America has a video interview of Mazursky online. And here are a couple of videos interviews the Writers Guild of America did with Mazursky did last year.

Scott W. Smith 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“It’s all those movies from my youth that made me want to get into this—all the popcorn movies.  The Die Hards, Empire, the Star Wars films. Those are the films that made me want to be a filmmaker. Recalling those—the excitiment of  being a 10-year-old kid in a theater again, writing for that kid is a big part of doing those kinds of films.”
Writer/director Stuart Beattie

A couple of years ago I worked on a small video project with Deion Sanders who was not just one of those rare athletes who could play both professional football and professional baseball, but he’s the only athlete in the history of civilization who has played in both a World Series and in a Super Bowl.  That is he played two completely different sports at the highest level possible. If anyone earned his nickname it was Prime Time.

A few days ago in my post Simple Stories/Complex Characters (Tip #95) I quoted screenwriter Stuart Beattie saying, “I’m a big fan of simple stories, complex characters. I love when stories get from here to here. I know then I’ll have room for great character stuff to go on.” But in yesterday’s post I wrote how he was one of the credited screenwriters on one of the most successful blockbuster franchises in Hollywood history—Pirates of the Caribbean. The lesson, of course, is that it’s really not an either/or question. The film world is big enough for Blanche DuBois and James Bond.

Human beings have an amazing ability to enjoy contrasting things. Off the top of my head I recall being one of about 100,000 people once at a Bruce Springsteen rock concert at the Los Angeles Coliseum, but also going to a small theater with a couple hundred people to hear a concert with classical guitarist Christopher Parkening. Granted, both concerts had guitars on stage, but they were two totally different experiences. And both enjoyable as I watched talented performers at the top of their fields.

Movies are no different. This year I went to see the intimate character driven Polish film Ida three times in the theater. But that doesn’t mean that the blockbusters Jaws and Raiders of the Lost Ark aren’t some of my favorite all-time movie going experiences.

Stuart Beattie explains the differences between writing a character driven story and a Hollywood blockbuster.

“The big blockbusters—you have to have a certain amount of spectacle, that’s why they’re blockbusters. You have to have that eye candy that people come back to see again, again and again.  So that usually means more complicated plots and just more stuff going on. Car chases, explosions, exciting moments—all that kind stuff. The plot stuff expands and the character stuff shrinks. You don’t have a lot of time to set up characters, you’ve got to get the plot rolling, things like that. Something like Collateral takes its time. In blockbusters you’re hitting [the audience] in their seats, you’ve got to provide those thrills, have them jumping all around. It’s a ride. It’s the difference between a roller coaster ride and a ride in a horse carriage around the park. It’s a different beast completely. Just as fun, just as many challenges [to write], but a completely different beast.”
Stuart Beattie
The Dialogue Interview: Learning from the Masters 
interview with Mike De Luca

Joss Whedon wrote and directed the blockbuster The Avengers and then turned around and wrote the script and directed Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing. Jon Favreau directed the blockbuster Iron Man and this year has a hit with the character driven Chef, which is closer in scope to the first indie film he wrote (Swingers). Swingers in turn was directed by Doug Liman who went on to direct The Bourne Identity.  All great examples of writers and directors at the highest level who’ve made character driven stories and blockbusters—and done it at the highest level.

But if there’s a Deion Sanders of filmmaking my vote goes to director Steven Spielberg who made Jurassic Park and Schindler’s List back to back—and that was just a couple of years after he directed The Color Purple and Empire of the Sun back to back. Spielberg is Prime Time+Oscar TimeX3.

P.S. A good example of a complex story and simple characters is Edge of Tomorrow. Maybe a little too complex. As I walked out of the theater it was interesting listening to various audience members trying to explain the film to each other (especially the ending). While the $178 million film is doing fine globally ($341 million) one of the reasons I think it was a disappointment in the States is the story—despite solid reviews and being full of spectacle (and exposition)was a little too complex to get good world of mouth advertising.

But you’ve got to give Hollywood credit for producing such an ambitious none-sequel project.

Scott W. Smith

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“I think 10 bucks to escape to a different world is worth the 10 bucks.
Stuart Beattie

“No survivors? Then where do the stories come from, I wonder?”
Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp)

Though I was a lover of the Walt Disney World ride Pirates of the Caribbean since my childhood, when I originally heard they were making a movie based on the ride my first thought was, “Well, that’s not going to be any good.”  Pirates of the Caribbean, Curse of the Black Pearl (2003) ended up being nominated for five Oscars, earned over $650 million worldwide, and made the IMDB Top 250 listed tied with The Graduate, The Hustler, A Fistful of Dollars, Rope and Jurassic Park.

Empire Magazine’s list of The 100 Greatest Movie Characters named pirate Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) as #8—just behind The Dude (Jeff Bridges in The Big Lebowski) and Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford). To date, the Pirates franchise of four films has a box office gross of  just over $3.7 billion. And as the word billion resonates in your head, you may be surprised to learn that the seeds of that franchise came from college students in Corvallis, Oregon. 

“Basically I was at Oregon State and I was hanging out with a friend and we were like, ‘Let’s write a movie.’ He’d never written a screenplay, but he liked that I was writing. I was like, ‘let’s do that–what’s a movie that hasn’t been done in a while?’ And we were thinking and thinking and suddenly we both said, ‘pirates.’ That hadn’t been done since Errol Flynn. And I end up writing this thing called Quest of the Caribbean, because I couldn’t use the actual Pirates of the Caribbean. But it had all the scenes from the [Disney] rides. The tongue in cheek Raiders of the Lost Ark version of pirates. And we sent that around town—got a lot of meetings, a lot of people interested, but it never ended up getting bought. And then years later I sold Collateral—this was in the period before it got made—and I submitted it again to Disney and  said, ‘Come on, you gotta do this.” And they said, “no, no, no—we’re actually working on our own now.” And so they had hired an in-house writer and he was doing a draft, but they wanted me to work on 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. So I was working on that and they were like, ‘We not happy with this draft [of Pirates] would you like a go of it?’ And I was like, ‘Well, I’ve been asking for 10 fucking years, yes please!’ So I went in—pitched and got the job. I did two drafts basically. The draft that got it going and got a draft to [Jerry] Bruckheimer and Johnny [Depp], and then [screenwriters] Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio came on.”
Screenwriter Stuart Beattie (Story credit on Pirates of the Caribbean, Curse of the Black Pearl, and character credit on the other Pirate films)
The Dialogue Interview: Learning from the Masters interview with Mike De Luca

Screenwriting from Oregon

Related post: Movie Cloning (Pirates) Ted Elliott talks about the movie The Prisoner of Zenda  (1937) as an inspiration.

Scott W. Smith

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“You don’t know what the story is 30 pages in, you don’t know who the main character is going to be, scenes that go on too long and don’t get buttoned, the scene ends but it drags on for three lines more—or starts three lines earlier [than it should], lack of momentum, lack of pace, tone that’s all over the place—saw a lot of that kind of stuff.”
Stuart Beattie
(On common problems he saw reading screenplays when he was a script reader)

“I have like five basic rules that I try to follow:
1. No book-ends. Meaning like an old man is sitting down by a fire saying, ‘Let me tell you a story,’ and then coming back to a guy at the end. Really bugs me. I think you can always take them out and it means nothing. 
2. Rule number two is no book-ends—for emphasis.
3. You don’t kill the dog. If there’s a dog in the film you don’t kill it. 
4. Four is saving the kiss until the end. That last moment. 
5. Feel free to disagree with the above four. Because at the end of the day there are really no rules. It’s just what you feel is a good story. And take all the experiences of all the films you’ve seen, and all of your life experiences and put that in as objectively as you can. 

Pulp Fiction broke tons of rules, I love that. Just in terms of structure, and character, and time, and all that stuff. I thought The Usual Suspects broke rules. You think Keaton is going to be the main character and it’s not. Breaking rules—I’ve often thought it’d be great to write a serial killer film, a cop chasing a serial killer you’ve seen a thousand times, and have the serial killer killing the cop half way through—and who are you left with? I’m left with a serial killer the rest of the film? Well, that’ll be interesting, wouldn’t it? And seeing how that comes about. That’s breaking a mold.  The most exciting, innovative storytelling kind of stuff. Trying to be on that cutting edge. Not just for the sake of being on that cutting edge, but because it’s interesting. It’s different, You haven’t seen it before. I think audiences are craving originality. I know I am in films. Just something different that I haven’t seen before. That’s at least worth the price of admission.”
Screenwriter Stuart Beattie (Derailed, Australia)
The Dialogue: Learning from the Masters (Part 3) interview with Mike De Luca

P.S. Hard to believe that interview has been online for almost a month and only has 51 views as I type this. It’s also hard to believe that audiences accept people getting killed all of the times in films, but killing a dog in a movie really disturbs people. You can show a character kicking a dog to show he or she is a villain, but if you shoot and kill a dog the odds are good you’ll have to edit that out or reshoot (like Beattie said they had to do in the movie Payback). I’m sure psychologist can tell us why. (And, for the record, dogs are the only animals that seem to get this immunity in Hollywood.)

“A lot of people die in Seven Psychopaths. It is brutal and it is bloody and it revels in its own excess: throats are slashed, people are burned alive, women are shot in the stomach, men get blown to pieces. CBS, which funded the film, was delighted when it read the screenplay, director Martin McDonagh’s follow-up to the much-loved In Bruges. Delighted, except for the bit where someone kills a dog. Hollywood doesn’t like dog-killing, and the studio suggested it would be prudent for him to remove that bit. Not a word about the women who die horribly and slowly, but a dog? You can’t kill a dog. ‘Of course,’ says McDonagh. ‘It’s rule number one.'”
Alex Godfrey, Seven Psychopaths: ‘You can’t kill dogs in Hollywood’

Of course, dogs do die in movies—sometimes gracfully in old age, and sometimes they are killed—and you could probably spend a whole day tracking down threads about it on internet. But I think the general consensus (at least in the United States) is that killing a dog in a movie hits people at such a gut level that it takes them out of the film going experience.

Related post:

“There are no rules.” (Tip #92)
There are no rules, but…(Tip #93+)
Screenwriting’s One Unbreakable Rule
Everything I Learned in Film School (Tip #1)

 

Scott W. Smith 

 

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“I need silence. I turn off the phone. I turn off the email, and I just sink into that world and I disappear.”
Screenwriter Stuart Beattie (I, Frankenstein)

“I have kids so I have to be disciplined. I do [my writing] from 9 to 5:30 everyday, Monday through Friday—keep those bankers’ hours. Otherwise I’d never get anything done. You have to know when to start and when to stop. Before I had a family I’d just go, go, go and just burn-out and flame-out and all that crap. So actually having those boundaries of starting and stopping is really good ’cause it lets you recharge. Play with the kids, run in the pool and recharge. And usually once they go to bed I go back to it like 8:30-9:00 and I write for another three or four hours.”
Stuart Beattie
The Dialogue: Learning from the Masters (Part 2) interview with Mike De Luca

And just in case you’re saying to yourself, “It must be nice to have 8 to 12 hours a day to write in silence without having to worry about a regular day job”—keep in mind that Beattie says he wrote “seven or eight scripts”—”and tons of drafts of all of those” before he sold his first one—and he was working as a waiter at the time he sold his first script.

P.S. I think the original phrase bankers’ hours was a reference to a short work day (say, 10-3), but Beattie is actually working overtime when he kicks in that extra 3-4 hours at night.

Related posts:
The Breakfast Club for Writers
Stephen J. Cannell’s Work Ethic
Stephen J. Cannell’s Work Ethic (Part 2)
Screenwriter’s Work Ethic
Stephen King’s Doublewide Trailer —“I wrote my first two novels, Carrie and Salem’s Lot in the laundry room of a doublewide trailer.”—King (I’ll add he did that while working as a high school English teacher in Hampden, Maine “making sixty-four hundred dollars a year.”)
Don’t Quit Your Day Job

Scott W. Smith

 

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