Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous’ Category

“I write for myself and that reader who will pay the dues. There’s a phrase in West Africa, in Ghana; it’s called ‘deep talk.’ For instance, there’s a saying: ‘The trouble for the thief is not how to steal the chief’s bugle but where to blow it.’ Now, on the face of it, one understands that. But when you really think about it, it takes you deeper. In West Africa they call that ‘deep talk.’ I’d like to think I write ‘deep talk.’ When you read me, you should be able to say, Gosh, that’s pretty. That’s lovely. That’s nice. Maybe there’s something else? Better read it again. Years ago I read a man named Machado de Assis who wrote a book called Dom Casmurro. Machado de Assis is a South American writer—black father, Portuguese mother—writing in 1865, say. I thought the book was very nice. Then I went back and read the book and said, Hmm. I didn’t realize all that was in that book. Then I read it again, and again, and I came to the conclusion that what Machado de Assis had done for me was almost a trick: he had beckoned me onto the beach to watch a sunset. And I had watched the sunset with pleasure. When I turned around to come back in I found that the tide had come in over my head. That’s when I decided to write. I would write so that the reader says, That’s so nice. Oh boy, that’s pretty. Let me read that again. I think that’s why Caged Bird is in its twenty-first printing in hardcover and its twenty-ninth in paper.
Maya Angelou
the Paris Review interview with George Plimpton

Read Full Post »

Leave It to Beaver is probably the most classic TV show ever. There’s just something so wholesome about it.”
Kurt Cobain interview with Kurt Saint Thomas

Who knows how long this will last
Now we’ve come so far, so fast
But, somewhere back there in the dust
That same small town in each of us
The End of the Innocence 
Written by Don Henley and Bruce Hornsby

I always enjoy hearing from people who’ve been to the top of the mountain. Their experiences and stories help give one perspective on life.  Just a few months before Rod Serling died he was asked, “If you could live in another time, another era, what period would that be?”

“That’s a good one. Well, if I had the means, I think I would like to be in Victorian times. Small town. Bandstands. Summer. That kind of thing. Without disease.  I think that’s what I would crave, a simpler form of existence. When you walked to a store and sat on the front porch.”
Rod Serling
Rod Serling’s Final Interview

Related posts:

Rod Serling’s Binghamton Roots
Movies from Main Street

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

No movie related golf link today—but a compelling golf related story via ESPN’s E:60:

Challenged Athletes Foundation: It is the mission of the Challenged Athletes Foundation® (CAF) to provide opportunities and support to people with physical disabilities so they can pursue active lifestyles through physical fitness and competitive athletics. CAF believes that involvement in sports at any level increases self-esteem, encourages independence and enhances quality of life.

Related: In four days there will be a St. Andrews Tournament at The American Veterans Golf Course in Lakewood, Washington. According to the website for Friends of American Lake Veterans:

The American Lake Veterans Golf Course is proud to sponsor this event to help send four combat wounded golfers to Scotland for six rounds of golf on some Scottish Links to include the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland.  We solicit your participation and/or support to make this an enjoyable event for some of our own.

 

Related posts:

Screenwriting from a Wheelchair
Screenwriitng from Hell

Scott W. Smith

 

 

Read Full Post »

“The manly sport of golf—where you can dress like a pimp and no one will care.”
Comedian Robin Williams

Though The Honeymooners (created by Jackie Gleason) is one of those classic and timeless programs from the early days of televison, the original 30-minute program only had a one  year run. A total of 39 episodes aired from October 1955 to September 1956. Of course, the resuns will run forever.

Sketches of The Honeymooners first aired on Cavalcade of Stars before exanding to the 30-minute versions, and sketches of The Honeymooners also became a part of The Jackie Gleason Show, a variety show that began airing in 1956.

But it’s amazing to think that Gleason and the “Classic 39″ writers—Herbert FinnMarvin MarxA.J. RussellLeonard SternWalter Stone and Sydney Zelinka cranked out 39 episodes in one year.  Of those writers and the four main actors, only Joyce Randolph (who played Trixe—the wife of Art Carney’s character) is still alive. If anybody has any links to The Honeymoon writers talking about the process of writing that show please send it my way.

P.S. Tonight at 10 PM (ET) on The Golf Channel, In Play with Jimmy Roberts will be doing a feature on Caddyshack creator Harold Ramis.

Scott W. Smith

 

Read Full Post »

“Courage is like a muscle. We strengthen it with use.”
Screenwriter and actress Ruth Gordon

After writing 1,700+ posts on screenwriting and filmmaking (on top of probably 1,700+ other blogs out there on screenwriting, filmmaking and movies) it’s hard to write something fresh, but today I want to touch on an Oscar-nominated husband and wife screenwriting team.

Sticking with my golf inspired posts lately, Pat and Mike is a 1952 George Cukor movie starting Katharine Hepburn (as a golfer) and Spencer Tracy.  It was written by wife and husband team Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin. Those two wrote three Oscar-nominated scripts;  A Double Life, Adam’s Rib, Pat and Mike.

Gordon won an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role in Rosemary’s Baby, and she won an Emmy for a guest appearance on the TV show Taxi. But many remember her most for her role as Maude in Harold and Maude. Gordon’s career in professional in theater began in 1915 when she appeared n Broadway (that year she was also an extra in a silent film) and it 1986 she published her autobiography My Side in 1976.

Kanin, who served in the US Army in 1941-1945, was uncredited as co-director on the 1945 Oscar-winning documentary The True Glory

I don’t know how many produced screenwriters are husband and wife teams, but I imagine it takes a lot of spunk to work and live together. Almost as much spunk as Katharine Hepburn in this scene from Pat and Mike:

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

Play Ball!

Scott at Tinkern

Baseball is in the air as the Major League Baseball season kicked off in full force today.  As I looked for something movie related to baseball I landed on a trailer from For Love of the Game. Partly because my last post was on Tiger Town in Lakeland, Florida where the Detroit Tigers hold their Spring Training—and in For Love of the Game stars Kevin Costner as a Detroit Tiger picture (and is directed by Sam Raimi—who is really from Detroit).

But before I get to the trailer let me mention that the micro doc Tinker Field: A Love Letter that I made this month as a personal project got a nice mention on Friday from the Orlando Sentinel by staff writer Mark Schlueb in his article Filmmaker produces video tribute to Tinker Field. (If you’re doing a personal project for yourself—it’s a nice bonus to get a good amount of positive feedback from others as well as some exposure in the press.)

P.S. Costner’s been in three baseball movies (Bull Durham, Field of Dreams, For Love of the Game), one golf movie (Tin Cup), and one biking movie (American Flyer), and in a few days has a movie coming out in a couple of weeks where he plays a General Manager of a pro football team—Draft Day.

Related posts:
Michigan’s Sam Raimi & The Guy with Greasy Hair
The Dickens of Detroit (Elmore Leonard)
Elmore Leonard (1925—2013)

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

“The former Buffalo Bills QB [Jim Kelly] has endured more pain, grief and disappointment than many nations, and it’s only getting worse.”
Rick Reilly
ESPN March 4, 2014

“Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.”
Andy Defresne in The Shawshank Redemption

Jim Kelly and his daughter at the hospital

Jim Kelly and his daughter at the hospital

Jim Kelly changed my life.

Indirectly—and I’ll explain in a minute—but now that he’s facing surgery tomorrow for an aggressive form of cancer I wanted you to keep him in your thoughts and prayers.

Kelly’s not a screenwriter, but once said he’d written the script for his life that included coaching his son Hunter one day. But Hunter was born with a genetic disorder and died in 2005 when he was 8-years-old. Jim and his wife Jill founded Hunter’s Hope Foundation in honor of their son.  In times like that I’m always reminded of the words of Roy Hobbs in The Natural, “My life didn’t turn out the way I expected.”

To one degree or another that’s true of every person who’s ever lived on this planet. I think that’s why stories dealing with struggle are so universal. Our culture celebrates power and strength, but it seems to be in moments of weakness where real and lasting impact takes place.

“His ability to lose, and lose big, and yet handle it, is so impressive to me. This has all made him an even better person than before, more patient even. It’s made him want to help even more people than before.”
Jill Kelly on her husband Jim who had part of his jaw removed last year due to cancer

For those of you who don’t follow football, Kelly is a member of the Pro Football Hall-of-Fame and from 1986 to 1996 was the quarterback for the Buffalo Bills.

My path crossed Kelly’s in August of 1981 at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. I was a first year football walk-on and Kelly was the starting QB. I was so low on the totem pole that as practices first started I didn’t even have a “U” on my helmet. That’s the truth. But I did have “Smith” written on tape across top front of my helmet, and perhaps the only conversation I ever had with Kelly was when he said, “Hey, Smitty” and he threw me the ball to warm his arm up before practice.

For Kelly who would later be the only QB to take a team to the Super Bowl four years in a row, that moment probably doesn’t make his highlight memory reel. But if you’re a first year walk-on and you’re catching a football from the starting QB you don’t forget that moment. But that’s not how Kelly changed my life.

In high school I was an all-conference football player but lacked size, grades, and about anything else that would make a college offer me a scholarship. But I still had this desire to play major college football. I went to a community college for a year to improve my GPA and also worked at a small newspaper as a sports writer and photographer. So as I looked for a college that had a good passing program (and a solid film school) I landed on Miami as the perfect fit.

Because Miami has won more national championships in football than any other school in the last 30 years, people forget before Kelly led the Hurricanes to a Peach Bowl victory after the 1980 season—Miami hadn’t even won a bowl game since 1966. I liked the direction head coach Howard Schnellenberger was taking the team and dreamed about catching passes from Kelly who was fresh off being the offensive MVP in that Peach Bowl.

So to a certain extent I lived that dream on a very, very micro level. I often joke that I had a the shortest career of any player who ever wore a Hurricane uniform in a game. I dressed out for exactly one JV football game playing exactly zero downs—and then dislocated my shoulder in practice, had surgery, and walked-off. (Didn’t even make the team picture that was taken later in the season.) About the only other thing Kelly and I have in common is we both had shoulder surgery done by the team physician Dr. Kalback.

But if it hadn’t been for Kelly I don’t think I would have chosen the University of Miami. So that’s indirectly how he changed the course of my life. With playing football out of my system I decided to head to California to finish film school, met my wife, etc. etc, etc.

So if you’ve enjoyed any aspect of this blog over the years–know that Jim Kelly played a part in all of this. There’s a wake behind great leaders where they have a positive impact that they are totally unaware of.

Please keep he and his family in your thoughts and prayers because he’s one of the good guys. And consider donating to Hunter’s Hope as they seek to alleviate the pain children are suffering from Krabbe Disease.

P.S. When Kelly was first drafted by the Buffalo Bills he says he actually cried, because he did not want to play in a cold weather climate. And before he joined the Bills, he played in the USFL in the Astrodome for the Houston Gamblers. But as the USFL folded he reluctantly joined the Bills. Lesson there is sometimes when we go to the places we don’t want to go magical things can happen.

Related Posts:
Screenwriting Quote #19 (Kurt Warner)
Screenwriting and the Super Bowl
Screenwriitng Quote #29 (William Blinn) Screenwriter of Brian’s Song about Gale Sayers

Update 4/8/14: Doctors decided they could treat Kelly this time with radiation and so this week he begin radiation treatment five days a week for the next seven weeks for his skin cancer (squamous cell carcinoma).

Scott W. Smith

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: