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Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous’ Category

Here’s my 9/11 post a couple of days late. It’s the Anchormen from the United States Naval Academy covering the Eagles song Hole in the World. The song was written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey after the events surrounding September 11, 2001.

Scott W. Smith

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“Nearly every moment of every day we have the opportunity to give something to someone else— out time, our love, our resources —and I have always found more joy in giving when I did not expect anything in return.”
Truett Cathy

I had the opportunity to hear Truett Cathy speak probably 20 years ago when I was running audio where he was speaking. I only remember one thing from that talk; he said that he learned as a kid selling magazines in kind of a newsstand/street style (think the Newsies—without the singing and dancing)  and he learned that some people would always pay more for a magazine, even if it was essentially the same magazine, just because it was more expensive.

Cathy moved on from selling magazines to selling chicken sandwiches. Lots of them. The New York Times reported that in 2013 the company he founded, Chick-fil-A, had “1,800 restaurants and sales of more than $5 billion.” Cathy died this week at the age of 93.

“Rising to prominence between Robert Woodruff, who took over Coca-Cola in the 1920s, and Sam Walton, who began the Walmart chain with a small store in Bentonville, Ark., in 1950, Mr. Cathy was one of a handful of Southern entrepreneurs who in one lifetime took small, hometown companies to a global level.”
Kim Severson
New York Times 

As of March 2014 Forbes listed Cathy’s net worth at $6.2 billion. That put him on the list of the top 250 wealthiest Americans. Not bad for a man born in a small town in Georgia with a high school education, who started working as a youth during The Great Depression. But more impressive is his philanthropic work. In 2008 he won the William E. Simon Prize for his charity work that included work with foster children and awarding more than $23 million in scholarship funding.

And while the man who spent 50 years as a Sunday School teacher may not seem like a candidate for having a hand in movie business but he did that as well. He helped finance the faith-based film on basketball great Pete Maravich, The Pistol, The Birth of a Legend (1991). Maravich was an undersized player as a youth who would go on to be named as one of the 50 Greatest Basketball Players in NBA History. 

More recently Cathy. via the Cathy Family Trust, helped with financing Pinewood Atlanta Studio.

Georgia’s film tax incentives make it one of the top five production destinations in the US.  (The Frank Darabont created TV program The Walking Dead films in Georgia.) Pinewood’s newly opened studio just south of downtown Atlanta has 288 acres and six sound stages up to 30,000 square feet.

“Pinewood Atlanta’s location will contribute significantly to Georgia’s growing reputation as a top draw for movie and television productions. We welcome the business this world-renowned company will bring to the state and the jobs it will create for our crew base and supporting companies.”
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal

A couple of months ago I read that Marvel’s Ant-Man with be shot at Pinewood Atlanta.

So when you read articles about Atlanta the New Hollywood, you can give Cathy some of the credit (or, if you’re in L.A., some of the blame). He earned his wealth (to borrow that title from the great Anne Lamott book on writing) bird by bird—and cow by cow.

‘Put two Cows on a billboard with a bucket of paint and a brush, and they’ll create some unexpected opportunities…The Cows still haven’t learned to spell, but five years after they painted their first billboard, Chick-fil-A had doubled our sales volume. The lesson from the Cows is the lesson of my life: Take advantage of unexpected opportunities.”
S. Trutte Cathy
Eat Mor Chikin:Inspire More People

P.S. Pinewood Studios is not the only game in Atlanta either. EUE/Screen Gems Studio Atlanta has 10 stages, Atlanta Filmworks Studio and Stages has 57,000 square feet of production space, Raleigh Studios in Atlanta has four sound stages, and there’s Tyler Perry Studio. There are others—but you get the idea.

Related Posts:
Martin Luther King Jr. and Screenwriting (Includes a photo I took in Atlanta on the weekend after Coretta Scott King died.)
“Super-Serving Your Niche” Includes a photo of Tyler Perry’s studio I took when I drove through Atlanta last year.
Creativity and Milking Cows

Scott W. Smith

 

 

 

 

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Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.
What Labor Day Means, US Department of Labor

“When is everything going to get back to normal?”
Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in the Mad Men episode Tea Leaves

photo-2

 

Let me start with the good news—and then I’ll get to my car wreck. Yesterday Red Shark News posted Seven Must Read Blogs for Screenwriters and Screenwriting from Iowa…and Other Unlikely Places was the first blog mentioned. That nudge at the end of August helped this blog have its most viewed month in a year and a half.  Welcome to the new readers, and I appreciate the shout-out by Patrick Jong Taylor.

“Screenwriting From Iowa…and Other Unlikely Places reads as a travelogue to the vast world of screenwriting beyond the borders of Los Angeles. Although never stated in so many words, the blog progresses two inter-related messages: learning and practicing the craft of screenwriting is not dependent on geographic proximity to major industry towns (like LA); and your own environs, no matter where you are, can be an enormous source for inspiration and discovery.”
Patrick Jong Taylor

The origins of physically starting this blog go back to January 2008 after I saw Juno when I was living in Iowa and realizing that it was written by an outsider to the film industry. Diablo Cody followed her Catholic prep school education in the Chicago area by getting an undergraduate degree in Media Studies from the University of Iowa, then writing Juno at her home and a Starbucks in the suburbs of Minneapolis. (Synergy in action: That year Cody won an Oscar for her screenplay and I won a Regional Emmy in Minneapolis for my blog.)

If you want to read one post that sums up what I’m after here check out; The Secret to Being a Successful Screenwriter (Seriously). No snake oil being sold there. Free advice that follows where Oscar-winning screenwriter Michael Arndt (Toy Story 3) says 99% of your efforts should go to becoming a better screenwriter.

Now, the bad news. (And for new readers; I usually use weekends and Holidays to re-post, not post, or go off the topic of screenwriting and filmmaking just for a change of pace. And on weekday post I aim for  200 words or less.)

My Labor Day weekend started with a bang. While stopped at red light, the above car slammed into the back of my vehicle going between 30-40 mph. Thankfully I was driving a full-sized SUV that appears to have suffered only a mangled bumper. Though I had some pain in my back and neck I was able to drive home from the accident.

The next day x-rays showed there appears to be a hairline fracture in my neck. I was given a couple prescriptions for pain killers and muscle relaxers, and supposed to see a specialist tomorrow. I’m sure many readers have been in worse accidents. Car wrecks where some involved didn’t walk away— or if they did had to use a cain or a wheelchair.

I haven’t been in an accident in over 25 years, and while thankful it wasn’t worse it still shakes you up. You’re suddenly  more sensitive to the tail-gaters, and how many small cars are on the road. I don’t see buying (or even renting) a compact car in my near future.

Last week I did a solo video shoot that wrapped late at night so I lined up all my gear at the door so I could back my SUV up and load everything at once. It was such a ridiculous amount of gear that I stopped and took a picture. And I don’t think my 72 pound Arri IV light kit is even in this shot. I’ll see what the specialist says tomorrow about my neck, but thankfully I’m in post production this week so no heavy lifting scheduled.

photo-3

Who knows, maybe that accident will cause me to embrace some of the smaller cameras some are already using. A couple of weeks ago I was interviewed by the Orlando Sentinel because of my micro-doc on Tinker Field, and was interested at the simple small camera set-up the one-man reporter/cameraman/editor used. That followed by my renting the mirrorless Lumex GH4 camera that shoots stills and 4K video and feels like it weighs as much as a box of Animal Crackers.  And seeing footage of the newest GoPro shot with the Steadicam Smoothee is impressive. The technology—and high quality— available in small packages these days is stunning.  (And everything I listed above will be relatively outdated in two years.)

All that to say, have a happy Labor Day—and drive safely.

P.S. Just to keep it movie related; car crashes are such a major part of American movies because cars are such a integral part of American culture and they also fit the bill for conflict on many levels. The car crash scene I thought about after my accident was the one in Sweet Dreams (1985) written by Robert Getchell and starring Jessica Lange as county singer Patsy Cline.

Related posts:

Everything I Learned in Film School (tip #1)
Neil Simon on Conflict
Screenwriting’s One Unbreakable Rule
Screenwriting Quote of the Day #16 (Richard Walter)  “Planes that land safely do not make the headlines and nobody goes to the theater, or switches on the tube, to view a movie entitled The Village of the Happy Nice People.”
Juno Has Another Baby  “I guess when you’re coming from the middle of the country and you’re not part of the industry and you’re just telling your own story, I think it’s easy to be more original.”—Diablo Cody

Scott W. Smith   

 

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“[Robin Williams] was one of a kind. He arrived in our lives as an alien – but he ended up touching every element of the human spirit.”
President Obama on the death of Williams whose first starring role was as an alien on the TV show Mork & Mindy

“Robin signing on definitely was the linchpin for [Good Will Hunting] getting made.”
Producer Chris Moore
Good Will Hunting: An Oral History
Boston Magazine article by Janelle Nanos, January 2013

“We are food for worms lads. Because, believe it or not, each and every one of us in this room is one day going to stop breathing, turn cold and die…Carpe diem. Seize the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary.”
English teacher John Keating (Robin Williams) in Dead Poets Society (1989)
Screenplay by Tom Schulman

Related posts:

Jonathan Winters (1925-2013)
Where Do Ideas Come From (A+B=C) Whenever I give a talk on creativity I always mention Robin Williams.
“The Greatest Gift” How the much loved movie It’s a Wonderful Life is a story rooted in depression, disillusionment, alcoholism and attempted suicide. 
Don’t Waste Your Life Screenwriting (2.0)

P.S. When comedian and actor Freddie Prinze (Chico and the Man) shot and killed himself at age 22 in 1977 I started to understand a connection between creative talent and depression, and sometimes depression mixed substance abuse.  And that even comedic ability didn’t not make one immune to suffering from depression and/or substance abuse problems. Johnny Carson, Jim Carrey, and Juno screenwriter Diablo Cody have all talked about their struggles with depression. Not all who suffer from depression take their lives as Ernest Hemingway, Vincent Van Gogh, or (apparently) Robin Williams—but I really believe there is something going on in the brains of some (many, all?) artists that helps them reach great heights, but also causes them to experience tremendous— even debilitating— lows.

Final thought: “All humor is rooted in pain.” —Commedian Richard Pryor

Scott W. Smith

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“I also think you can learn to be a good writer. Like I was a bad writer, actively bad, and I willed myself to get better. I really tried to learn what are the building blocks of a good story. And I think often people who aren’t naturally good writers, you’re just intimidated because you feel like you have to be touched by an angel to be a good writer, but you just have to have taste on what’s interesting.”
Ira Glass

Ira Glass got a little heat recently after seeing the play King Lear and tweeting, “I think I’m realizing: Shakespeare sucks.” As others pointed out, including The New Yorker, Glass later backed down saying, “That was kind of an off-the-cuff thing to say that in the cold light of day, I’m not sure I can defend at all.”

But the man’s welcomed to his opinion. The United States is still a free country. It seems the more we talk about tolerance, the more intolerant we’re becoming. (Another way of saying it is, “we’re tolerant of everyone—as long as they think like us.”) Of course, it’s fair game for people to critique his critique, but at times the internet seems to be a giant funnel to make the smallest tweet an Middle eastern-size crisis.

While Shakespeare is more well-known than Glass (as more than one person online pointed out in their critique of Glass’s tweet) Glass’s work stand on its own. For more than 30 years he’s been writing for NPR and is most known as the producer and host for the radio program This American Life, which last year broadcast its 500th show. In 2009 he won the Edward R. Murrow award for outstanding contribution in public radio.

Shakespeare may have created some of best drama in history, but he never worked in radio, had a the top-rated  iTunes podcast or spoke at Google headquarters like Glass has accomplished . Granted those options weren’t around 400 years ago, but I’d like to think the stage is big enough for both storytellers.

“There is a thing in writing that I feel I had to learn on my own that I’m surprised isn’t taught in school, and that is people don’t teach story structure properly in school. I think that when we’re all taught how to write, like we’re taught topic sentences—we’re taught the way that you would write an essay with topic sentences at the top of the paragraph, and then you fill out the paragraphs, and that basically was learning to write in school. But in fact, there’s a structure of telling a story that’s more effective than that, that I feel I had to learn by reading and by trial and error and whatever, which is much more anecdote based. So for example, the stories on our show the structure of them is really built around plot and ideas.  And it’s a very traditional kind of story structure where you just want to think through the sequences of actions where one thing leads to the next, leads to the next, leads to the next. So really you want to break down wherever is going to happen into this happened, and then this happened, and then this happened.  And the advantage of having forward motion is that it inherently creates suspense because you wonder what’s going to happen next. And so you hold people’s attention because simply moving forward action, it’s like you create suspense and you can do it with the most banal story possible, or the most everyday story…It’s so much more mesmerizing than topic sentences, because you’re utilizing something that’s so primal in us because you can create suspense.”
Ira Glass Q&A at Google

P.S. Perhaps the best thing about Glass’s tweet is some people were asking, “Who’s Ira Glass?” Which if Glass was a marketing genius was a great move. As of a month ago This American Life left Public Radio International and is now independently distributed. Cara Buckley wrote in the NY Times,  “Mr. Glass will now be responsible for the show’s marketing and distribution, as well as for finding corporate sponsors. It’s the equivalent of Radiohead’s releasing its own album ‘In Rainbows,’ or Louis C. K.’s selling his own stand-up special — except all the time, for every show. It’s the kind of move that can signal radical changes in the public radio firmament, with National Public Radio and other distributors wondering who, if anyone, may follow suit, and whether Mr. Glass will return if he fails.”

P.P.S. Glass also gave a giant boost to the career of writer David Sedaris by having him read The Santaland Diaries story on NPR back in the ’90s when Sedaris was still working odd jobs to make ends meet. Sedaris told the story of working as an elf at Macy’s one Christmas and said after that broadcast, “The telephone started ringing and it wouldn’t stop.”

Update: Apparently Glass attended the play King Lear in NYC with writer/director Judd Apatow and commedian/actress Amy Schumer so he could have easily said one of the humorist hacked his Twitter account regarding his Shakespeare tweets.

Related post:

Ira Glass on Storytelling
What’s Next?
“All stories are emotionally based.”
Robert McKee vs. Richard Walter
Bedford Falls vs. Pottersville
Writing and House Cleaning (David Sedaris quote about one of his jobs)
Can Screenwriting Be Taught (2.0)
The Secret to Being a Successful Screenwriter (Seriously) This guy loves Shakespeare.

Scott W. Smith

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“My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.”
LaBron James
Sports Illustrated 7/11/14

“Unless you are hardhearted or a Miami Heat season-ticket holder, this is tough not to love.”
Jason Gay on LeBron James returning to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers
NY Times

“James seems to be following a higher calling with this move. We can’t help but admire his devotion to Flyover Land.”
Rolling Stone article by Jeff Allen 

Years ago when screenwriter Joe Eszterhas moved  from Hollywood to the Cleveland area people thought he was crazy. Now that basketball great LeBron James is moving from Miami to the Cleveland area, it looks like this is just a new hip trend. (Kind of like those artists I keep reading and hearing about who are moving from places like New York City to Detroit.)

“Yeah, I think if you’re off the beaten path in any way it’s always tough. I’ve been off the beaten path my whole life.”
Hollywood screenwriter/Ohio resident Joe Eszterhas
The Hollywood Interview

The sun is in fact shinning brighter this week in Northeast Ohio. Property value in Akon probably went up 2% in the last few days since the world’s greatest basketball player announced he was returning to his home state to play for the Cleveland Cavaliers.

The odds are slim that anyone from Team LeBron ever read my post Fueling Your Imagination, which was about filmmaker Jim Jarmusch who was from Akron, Ohio. But this is what I wrote on June 20, 2010 when James was thinking about leaving Cleveland:

The Akron-Cleveland has changed a lot since Jarmusch was a kid (and even when he shot part of Stranger in Paradise there in the 80s) and I’d like to think that the next Jim Jarmuschs from the area, like current NBA MVP LeBron James, stay in their hometown and do their thing for the world to see.

So it took a LeBron a few years to come around, but I’m glad he’s going to play for his hometown crowd again. (He won two NBA championships playing for the Miami Heat so I don’t think he has any regret leaving.) But he’s now done the Rocky Balboa thing where he’s redefined winning. You remember in Rocky where he realizes he can’t beat Apollo Creed so he redefines winning as just being able to do something that no other boxer has done, and that’s to go the distance—all 15 rounds—with the champ. So at the end of the film even though Rocky loses the spilt decision, in a sense he’s a winner.

LeBron James is refining his vision.

“When I left Cleveland, I was on a mission. I was seeking championships, and we won two. But Miami already knew that feeling. Our city hasn’t had that feeling in a long, long, long time. My goal is still to win as many titles as possible, no question. But what’s most important for me is bringing one trophy back to Northeast Ohio.”
LeBron James

Northeast Ohio has a special place in my heart because it’s where my father was from, and my grandfather worked for more than 30 years at Youngstown Sheet & Tube. (YS&T was Ohio’s largest employer in the 1930s.)

The area now has had its share of economic problems. LeBron alone won’t be a cure all, but with Heisman Trophy winning QB Johnny Manziel being drafted by the Cleveland Browns just a few months ago, Northeast Ohio is on the upswing and is enjoying its moment in the spotlight.

In honor of LeBron heading home to Ohio, I’ve decided to pull together all my Ohio-centered posts over the years. And there are a lot of them. You may be surprised that  screenwriters Mark Boal, Dudley Nichols, Ernest R. Tidyman, Rod Serling, Willima Golman, and actors Cary Grant, Tom Hanks, Jennifer Garner, and Paul Newman, as well as directors Chris Columbus and Jonathan Demme and former Disney head Michael Eisner  all have roots in Ohio.

The Superman from Cleveland
The Lucky Slob from Ohio
Toy Story 3’s Ohio Connection
Rod Serling’s Ohio Epiphany
From Poland, Ohio to a 155-Foot Yach
The Thinking Person’s Playwrights
The Oberlin Express
Oberlin to Oscars
Jailbait, Rejection & Screenwriter Mark Boal’s Start
Screenwriter Dudley Nichols (1895-1960)
Shoot for the Moon
The Original Screenwriting Rock Star
Screenwriter Ernest R. Tidyman
Screenwriting from Sunset Blvd.
Screenwriting Quote #61 (Jonathan Winters)
The Real & Creepy Shawshank Prison
Middle-Earth in the Midwest
Directing Non-professional Actors
Before ‘Friday Night Lights’
Project Greenlight 2 (Part 7)
Genius, Madness, and a Genuine Third Act
Emmy-Winning Writer Rick Cleveland
Cleveland Screenwriter Hits ‘Lottery Ticket’
The Weather Started Getting Rough (Two of the Gilligan’s Island cast members were  from Ohio)
Fueling Your Imagination (Jarmusch Style)
Screenwriting Quote #129 (Bob Peterson)
E.T. was from Youngstown (Kinda)
Youngstown’s Hollywood Connection
Son of a Son of a Steelworker
Screenwriting Quote #116 (Chris Columbus)
The Story of Men on the Moon
William Goldman Stands Alone
The Other Scott Smith
Screenwriting Quote #72 (Michael Eisner)
Screenwriting Quote #42 (Brad Anderson)
Screenwriting Quote #29 (William Blinn)
Screenwriting Quote of the Day #23 (John Grogan)

P.S. Cleveland rocks! Check out this interview with Joe Eszterhas where he talks about when he took Jimi Hendrix to a Hungarian restaurant one night in Cleveland.

Scott W. Smith

 

 

 

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Since this is the last day of spring 2014, I thought I’d do a little spring cleaning and doing something I don’t often do–write two posts in one day. (There may even be a third one later.) But in light of yesterday’s post (Susannah Grant on Failure) by the screenwriter of Erin Brockovich, I thought I’d sneak in this quote I read in last Sunday’s NY Times that was part of a graduation speech at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

“Failure is going to be a part of the process. You’re all here because you’re good at not failing, right? This is the culmination of doing a great job at not failing. There are no G.P.A.s after this. There’s going to be lots of setbacks. There’s going to be lots of failures. No one introduces me as the founder of My Mobile Menu, also known as Mmm, because that was the company we started before Reddit, Steve [Huffman] and I started that, and for a year and a half worked on something that went nowhere. But that’s O.K. Failure is an option.”
Alexis Ohanian
The 31-year-old co-founder of Reddit (one of the 50 biggest websites in the United States)
New York Times
Sunday June 15, 2014

P.S. Just to tie in a great filmmaker born in Kenosha, WI—who knew both success and failure in his career —read the post Screenwriting Quote #38 (Orson Welles).

Related post:
The Shakespeare of Hollywood spent part of his childhood not far from Kenosha in Racine, WI.
J.K. Rowling on the Benefits of Failure

Scott W. Smith

 

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